DSS Town Hall

On 1st December, DSS held a Town Hall meeting in the Special Events Room of McKeldin Library; all UMD Library staff were invited to attend. Questions were submitted prior to the meeting via an online form with the opportunity for in-person questions on the day.

The meeting began with an introduction by Trevor Munoz since Babak Hamidzadeh was unable to attend. This interactive conversation between DSS and other divisions is supported by a monthly blog: DigiStew.

Department updates followed

Robin Pike – DCMR [Digital Conversion & Media Reformatting]  

  • Digitization projects for FY17 are on track
  • Rebecca Wack, Digital Projects Librarian, will begin work in January
  • Scott Pennington continues to manage a Mellon Grant funded digitization project
  • Eric Cartier has been planning 2017 in-house digitization
  • Mary Dulaney is assisting with fundraising opportunities

Kate Dohe – DPI [Digital Programs & Initiatives]

  • The cross-divisional digital preservation team is due to report in early 2017.
  • Josh Westgard has been working on migrating content into ArchiveSpace
  • E-publishing: one faculty and one student-run journal will be published
    • Terps Publish is a new student publishing event to be piloted in 2017
  • ICDL and the Health Equity repository is near completion

Ben Wallberg – SSDR [Software Systems Development & Research]

  • An Annual Staffing Request application to replace spreadsheets will roll out next week. Andrea White will conduct training.
  • Hippo upgrades: version 10 is due in January, version 11 in the spring.  Hippo will release version 12 in the summer. This will bring us up to date; annual upgrades will follow.
  • Libi migration: development is paused while the Libi Advisory Team consult with, and get feedback from, divisions. Development work will resume in February. Two standalone applications, Student Applications and Idea Board, will be released next year.
  • Website stability has improved following work with USS on server improvements.

David Dahl – CLAS [Consortial Library Applications Support]

  • USMAI now has 17 members: Loyola/Notre Dame joined in the summer and their migration to Aleph is due for completion in January.
  • Aleph will be the ILS for the foreseeable future. CLAS is monitoring potential new systems.
  • The USMAI Data Collection and Analysis Working group will produce a report in January.
  • The pilot institutional repository is ending. Further plans are in progress.

Uche Enwesi – USS [User & Systems Support]

  • USS supports over 1000 machines and 60 printers
  • USS have have received over 7700 calls in the helpdesk and USS have closed over 5500 service requests.
  • Work continues with Div IT to manage desktop machines using SSCM to push out upgrades.
  • Makerspace: USS driven printing is decreasing while training is increasing: the trend is for self printing. Andy Horbal and Preston Tobery are working with professors to integrate 3-D printing into the curriculum.
  • The public and TLC machines have been upgraded; staff upgrades are now in line.
  • Researching VDI technology to deploy a new machine image quickly and smoothly.
  • Researching Mobile printing for smart-phones and tablets is being investigated for used with pay for print.
  • Additional training on Google Suite will take place in December.
  • Exploring the possibility of Windows 10 for staff and public use.  Asking staff if they are interested to test out Windows 10 to contact DSS helpdesk.

Trevor Muñoz – MITH [Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities]

  • Synergies among African American History and Culture, and Digital Humanities (AADHUM) multi-year initiative
  • Digital Humanities incubators (part of AADHUM): training begins in January
  • Documenting the Now – social media research continues

Next, managers answered questions that were submitted ahead of time

Q Do we know everything DSS does so we can say which ones need to be discontinued? What are DSS priorities?

Judi read out Babak’s response:

We have a list of projects and all managers are aware of their initiatives and operations. Our priorities really boil down to what the units in DSS do. Much of what DSS does is driven by priorities and demand from other Divisions and is coordinated with other divisions.

Q Everything in the Libraries nowadays is technology related. Sometimes decisions are made in DSS without any input from the rest of the Libraries. Sometimes it feels as if DSS is very self-centric and makes decisions for all of us without any input.

Judi read Babak’s answer:

The bulk of what DSS does is driven by priority and demand from other divisions in Libraries. There are projects that DSS initiates, within its mandate, with other units on Campus, or on its own as part of a known DSS service. There may be cases where better communication and coordination is needed. If those cases are raised, we would appreciate it and will try to respond to them and improve communication.

Q Why is the ITD sign still on the main stairwell door?

Judi: a new sign has been ordered.

Q What is the status of upgrade to Fedora 4? And the upload of the backlog of materials that are ready for entry into University AlbUM?

Kate: The Diamondback has been released to DPI and will be imported into Fedora 4.

Migration of existing content is being planned for 2017; stakeholders are being consulted.

Partnering with SSDR:

  • The Fedora 4 administrative interface for collection managers, tentatively named Archelon, is due early in 2017.
  • Work continues on a newspaper viewer enabling users to clip, download a newspaper article and use OCR with the image. A demo is coming soon. The intent is to repurpose this open source software for other applications.

DPI, USS and SSDR analysed Fedora 4 storage needs and solutions: recommendations are due in 2017.

Q I’d like to know about the role of the data services librarian (i.e. Karl’s old position). This type of service is interesting and I am always looking to learn more about library/researcher collaboration/interaction.

Kate: The search is underway; this position is intended to play an active role in data management serving the needs of Maryland faculty.

Q I think DSS should help us develop a more comprehensive tool for analyzing our subscribed resources – databases and journals. The work that was led by Mark Hemhauser was great, but needed tweaking. This year’s serials review abandoned the great work that Mark started, and it was a step back. We are spending so much money on collections, and it is sad that we are not trying to do some more comprehensive evaluation of the use, cost, etc. Mark’s work was a good start. What happens after a person has left the organization?

Ben:

  1. How do we support applications that are not ready to go into full production? Send in a helpdesk ticket if you would like to set up a sandbox or trial to see whether you like an application. No support or backups are provided with sandboxes; it is a quick way to see how an application works. If the sandbox test is successful, then full production is considered.
  2. Tracking applications: we write a Service Level Agreement [SLA]. This is a process for both parties to set out expectations, timelines and periodic reviews. Documentation is amended when a person leaves the Libraries.
  3. In this case the documentation shows that the application started as a pilot, moved into production, was monitored, assessed and data was downloaded. Stakeholders agreed to decommission the production application.

David: The USMAI Data Collection and Analysis working group have conducted an initial investigation of USMAI’s data needs for reporting and assessment purposes. USMAI’s new Acquisitions & Licensing Coordinator is leading an initiative to identify an ERM [Electronic Resource Management system] to aid license management and cost analysis.

Q Is Aleph here to stay? What happened with testing on circ/print functions before the upgrade to Aleph v22?

David: The short answer is yes, Aleph, is here to stay. An email update was distributed this morning with more details. CLAS team continue to maintain and enhance Aleph to support the consortium’s work.

Aleph upgrade:

  • First upgrade in 6 years; CLAS carried out a review of the migration.
  • Each USMAI campus has responsibility for testing locally
  • Future upgrades will emphasise the need for local testing, especially for printing and unique workstation setups.

Q  Messages from DSS to USMAI are not conveyed to Library staff. Only people subscribing to the USMAI reflector get to know them. Shouldn’t someone inform UMD Libraries Staff of USMAI initiatives/updates/etc?

David:

  • The CLAS team communicate with USMAI; each USMAI campus communicates with its staff
  • UMD Campus Contacts are Angie Ohler and Tim Hackman
  • Circulation, electronic resources, and other functional contacts should use judgement to forward to Library staff as necessary. Any staff member may join USMAI Communities of Interest, which are listed on the USMAI Staff Site (usmai.umd.edu/groups)
  • CLAS is looking at our systems for facilitating communication and collaboration within the consortium

Q When will you transfer the conference rooms from Exchange to Google Calendar?

Uche: this has already happened. Room owners have been contacted by USS.

Q I would like you to confirm times for on-site and/or virtual Help Desk visits (re: troubleshooting, software updates, hardware replacement)

Uche: USS contact staff via email and leave a phone message if necessary. In cases where Div IT inform of a security issue, USS will take control immediately.  In case where we do not need the user input, USS staff will take control and fix the problems.

Q I would like you to make sure staff images have up-to-date versions of software (ILLiad, Ares, etc.) so that we don’t need to submit upgrade tickets for new machines / new staff.

Uche: We are working with Div IT to use SSCM which will push out upgrades so that all machines have the same image.

Q Why do you close helpdesk tickets before confirming that the problem has been resolved?

Uche: Let Uche or Cece know if this happens to you. Re-open the helpdesk ticket if necessary.

Stew of the month: November 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

On November 13, Robin Pike and Liz Caringola visited Frostburg State University to discuss the digitization of the Frostburg Mining Journal and other Frostburg newspapers held in print by their Special Collections. Digitization of these important Western Maryland newspapers will move forward contingent on the award of a third NDNP grant, which would begin on September 1, 2016.

Other Digitization Activities

The vendor digitization projects went out including: over 10,000 pages to the Internet Archive from SCUA collection materials and diaries from the William Kapell collection in IPAM. These projects were funded by the DIC project proposal process.

Eric Cartier worked with Cindy Frank, Director of the Visual Resources Collection in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, to arrange a Digital Data Services digitization request with an architecture professor. Digitization assistants are scanning more than 100 color slides featuring images of buildings across the French countryside.

GA David Durden completed a reference spreadsheet of the most prominent grants that support digitization and digital projects. Robin will use this resource as she meets with librarians and staff to discuss funding sources for future digitization projects.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Over the course of the fall, DPI carried out a pilot to test the technical feasibility of hosting the International Children’s Digital Library on DSS servers. ICDL is a free and open repository of Children’s Literature in various languages that was developed by faculty in the iSchool. The pilot was a success, so with Collections Strategies and Services having expressed their interest in supporting this important collection, the Libraries are now moving ahead to provide web hosting services for the ICDL. For more information on the ICDL, see http://childrenslibrary.org.

Transcribe Maryland is a pilot project to test the workflows and procedures for crowdsourced transcription of Digital Collections materials. In November, Josh Westgard carried out the migration of more than 17,000 images making up over 800 documents from our digital collections repository to a platform to support public transcriptions of those documents. The pilot project will take place in the spring semester 2016 in support of a course being offered in the English Department.

DPI, with help from DSS colleagues, is about to launch REDCap an open source web application created by Vanderbilt University for building and managing online surveys and databases. REDCap will be offered as a part of Research Data Services and available to UMD faculty and researchers. Please contact lib-research-data@umd.edu for more information.

Software Development

Hippo CMS  has been successfully upgraded to version 7.9.  The primary improvements for content creators are the new CKEditor for making HTML content changes and the channel manager options to preview pages on various device screen sizes.  Also, automatic updates for database finder and the staff directory have been restored.

The project to move the website to a Responsive Web Design template is now entering its final phases.  The majority of the template development work has been completed and being prepared for promotion to production.  We are also working with the Web Advisory Committee to test the new template and create training opportunities for staff on how to update their content in preparation for the January 18 release date.

Initial development of the Fedora 4 authorization module based on the emerging Web Access Control (WebAC) standard for RDF based Access Control has been completed.  This new feature is being incorporated into the design for our Fedora 4 repository instance and the new Digital Collections administrative interface based on Hydra.

Staffing

Barbara Percival joined DCMR in November. A first-year iSchool student, she is currently producing digital files, and she’ll take over quality assurance inspections in 2016.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola was appointed to the MARAC Web Editing Team, effective January 1, 2016, for a two-year term.

Stew of the month: September 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

The first batch of newspapers for the 2014-2016 grant was accepted by Library of Congress and are now available on Chronicling America. The Catoctin Clarion from Mechanicstown (modern-day Thurmont), Maryland, is available from 1871-1919. Additional issues through 1922 will be uploaded in a later batch.

Other Digitization Activities

The sole source for the FY16 digitization vendor was approved. Robin Pike will contact collection managers to begin digitization after additional steps are completed (negotiating technical specifications, receiving quotes for estimates, sending signed quotes back, scheduling projects).

Robin worked with Vin Novara (SCPA) to submit a Letter of Inquiry to the Grammy Grant Foundation to apply for an Archiving and Preservation Projects grant to digitize the audio recordings in the Contemporary Music Project Archives.

Eric Cartier worked with Josh Westgard and Bria Parker (MSD) to make 98 digitized videos from the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange Archives (SCPA) and 39 digitized audio recordings from the Thirteen/WNET Arthur Godfrey Collection (SCUA) available in UMD Digital Collections. Both projects were digitized as part of the FY15 Digitization Initiatives Committee project proposal process.

Eric and assistant Cecilia Franck performed quality assurance on 137 digitized football films from the University Archives collections, which will be ingested into Digital Collections. Cecilia also performed sampled quality assurance on 590 digitized historic dissertations that will be ingested into DRUM.

Software Development

During internal testing of the new Hippo CMS  version 7.9 upgrade process we discovered some holes in our upgrade procedure and have been working on filling out the missing code and re-testing.  Unfortunately, progress on this issue was interrupted by instability problems in the production Hippo system which we tracked down to a conflict between several of our batch content loaders (Database Finder, Staff Directory) and a Hippo system architecture change we put into place in August.  As an interim step the instability problem has been fixed by disabling the batch loaders.  We are working with Hippo support staff to determine the root cause of the problem.

We are now in full implementation mode for the new Responsive Web Design template for the website.  This has involved some rapid design and decision making, as well as training for four developers new to Hippo CMS.  Once we complete our first draft of the core templates we will begin a process to promote the templates to the staging site for Libraries staff to get their first look their existing content rendered in the new site.  This will help them to make an assessment on how much work will be involved when it comes time to begin updating their content for the new site.

User and System Support

This summer, the Libraries embarked on a project to renovate the technology in classrooms 6103 and 6107 in Mckeldin Library. User Systems and Support (USS) and Teaching and Learning Services (TLS) worked together on the project to find a new way to use current technology along with different teaching methods in the classrooms so the rooms would be more dynamic and flexible. USS and TLS chose to try to have everything mobile. Since the furniture, Mac desktops, projector screens, and projector wouldn’t be able to support this new mobile initiative, they were all removed. Power outlets in the room were rearranged to go from supporting a static room to a more dynamic room.

USS evaluated and designed the technology, suggested furniture, and determined power outlet locations. To replace the projector, four 60 inch Sony Aqous TVs were purchased. sitting on mobile Peerless AV stands. The TVs weren’t installed on walls, but were installed on Peerless AV stands so the TVs can be rolled anywhere in the room (or outside the room). The main instructor laptop has an ActionTech wireless HD Video Transmitter installed on it. The transmitted video will go to an ActionTech wireless HD Video Receiver on each cart. This will allow an instructor the ability to show the same content to all the TV carts at the same time. The idea is to allow the students to be able to crowd around any TV so everyone can clearly see what the instructor is presenting, instead of the people close to the back of the room straining their eyes.   However, another purpose is to allow the students to split off in groups, each screen displaying different content so students can collaborate the assignments they are given. Each TV also has multiple inputs so students can connect and display what’s on the screen of their laptops, iPads, tablets, and other devices.

A special thanks goes to those in USS involved in getting the new room configurations and technology changed and installed — Alex Guzman, Brandon Eldred, Chamisa Carson, Francis Ifeacho, Grace Derbyshire, Pancratius Chuba, Preston Tobery, Sandra Ayensu, Stephanie Karunwi, Victoria Quartey. Also, thanks goes out to Rachel Gammons and the rest of Teaching and Learning Services for working with us to successfully renovate and add new technology in classrooms 6103 and 6107.

 

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

The CLAS team responded to 92 Aleph Rx submissions and 23 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in September.

clas-notes

CLAS Notes

In an effort to keep consortium members informed about important information and procedures, the CLAS team has started a weekly publication called CLAS Notes. Weekly notes are targeted at specific audiences (as determined by mailing list membership), but you can always view all the notes on the USMAI Staff Site at http://usmai.umd.edu/category/news-categories/clas-notes.

Staffing

David Steelman moved from a System Analyst position to a Software Developer position. David received his Bachelor of Science, Comprehensive, from Villanova University and his Master of Science, Computer Science, from the University of Maryland, College Park.  Before coming to work at College Park, he worked at Raytheon Solipsys Corporation where he worked as a Senior Software Engineer, working on projects such as the Tactical Display Framework (TDF), a Java-based object-oriented Command and Control Battle Management package.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola and Robin Pike attended the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) annual meeting in Washington, D.C. September 16-18. Liz gave a lightning talk on the Gateway to Digitized Maryland Newspapers, a database using Hippo/Solr that will allow users to easily identify sources for digitized Maryland newspapers. The gateway should be online after the next Hippo upgrade. Look for an announcement and additional information at that time.

Robin also attended the one-day Digital Maryland AV Conference held at the University of Baltimore on September 25.

DSS Town Hall

DSS Town Hall

On 4th June, 2015, DSS held a Town Hall meeting in the Special Events Room of McKeldin Library; all UMD Library staff were invited to attend. What follows is based on fantastic notes made by Liz Caringola; Heidi Hanson held the meeting evaluation. The meeting began with an introduction by Babak giving the background to this event with the hope that it would be the start of conversations between DSS and other divisions. DSS managers then gave 3 minute ‘elevator speeches’ outlining their work in the division. The Libraries are full of acronyms and DSS is no exception:

SSDR – Software Systems Development & Research

CLAS – Consortial Library Applications Support

DPI – Digital Programs & Initiatives

DCMR – Digital Conversion & Media Reformatting

USS – User and Systems Support

MITH – Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities

Judi summarized ways in which DSS can be contacted. The floor was then opened for questions from the audience.

A recent Library-wide computer migration to make Library staff usernames and passwords comply with campus security policies prompted several questions:

  • Using Adobe Acrobat XI Pro software – this was a problem caused by the campus license having expired. To get the problem fixed on your machine, submit a ticket to the Help Desk.
  • Could DSS change the amount of time that elapses before we our computers lock themselves? (This is one side effect of the AD migration.) Uche said that we can change the setting to increase the amount of time before the computer locks; this was met with applause. (The change was carried out within 24 hours of the meeting)
  • Where did Lync go? Give the Help Desk a call to get your password reset.

What is the best way to initiate contact with DSS if you’re managing a project that will require DSS assistance, and after initial plans are made, how can you get confirmation that action is being taken and within the agreed upon timeframe?

  • Babak said that initiating projects within the Libraries in general is not a formalized process, and DSS is no exception. We had hired a DSS project manager in February 2014 to help us manage projects. This position is currently vacant. We do need better project management processes and coordination. The Digitization Initiatives Committee (DIC) is a good example of formalizing project prioritization, initiation, and managing processes. It’s something we’ll continue to work at improving.
  • Contact DSS through the Helpdesk using these guidelines on Libi. Please start the conversation with DSS early in your plans.

Is there anyone in DSS who can help our group looking into e-books & mobile access to e-books? Can someone help the committee in their task to make access easier and more seamless?

  • Uche said that he needed to learn more about the committee’s requirements in order to figure out who on his team is the right person to help.
  • Trevor offered a general observation that projects or committees get formed and then later down the road realize that someone from DSS should be involved.
  • Babak said that the sooner DSS knows about a project and can be at the table with you, the better. Often times it’s good to have a technical person at the table just to say what’s possible or not, help you deal with vendors, etc.

What is the best way to orient new employees to what DSS does?

  • Babak: orientation for new Libraries employees should include a sheet or a packet that has technical problems information and describes DSS services.
  • Nathan: this problem is systematic across the Libraries. People in one division don’t know what people in another division do. A broader conversation might be needed to address this.
  • Trevor: the answer to this problem should be Libi, but we all acknowledge Libi isn’t in the best shape to do that presently. The Libi Sub Group has been looking into how to improve Libi so that we can use it for this purpose.

Should questions for units other than USS should go through a tracking system?

  • Babak and Uche: feel free to send any DSS-related question to the Help Desk, and it will get routed to the right group or person within DSS.

What can DSS do for Libraries patrons? What level of support is given to patrons versus internal staff? Should we ever refer patrons to DSS? Can we have more information about DSS’ strategy for working with campus partners?

  • Uche: USS will work with patrons, but they won’t open up non-Libraries computers.
  • Babak: Aside from general services, the Libraries get a lot of visibility, credibility, and profitability if we collaborate with campus partners. They get to know us and will start depending on us for certain tasks. Example of HIPAA compliance. No one else on campus wants to touch it, so why not us? We write also write proposals with partners. By getting involved in collaboration, we might be able to identify software, for example, that is needed but doesn’t exist. Whether we gain financially or contribute to an open effort, it gets our name out there and adds to our brand.
  • Trevor described MITH’s perspective. It is part of their strategy to work with patrons and campus partners. It is true that they don’t have an identified service point, but they are happy to hear from people about their ideas or possibilities for working together, and they try to be very responsive with those things, whether it’s by continuing the conversation or directing the person elsewhere. They have to be strategic about what activities they get involved in as a unit, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t want to talk to people outside the Libraries.
  • Robin addressed Kelsey’s questions as they pertain to digitization. Any patron or staff member can request that something from the Libraries holdings be digitized, provided that there is funding to pay for it. Depending on what it is, could be digitized in-house or go out to a vendor. For SCUA materials, these requests can be made through the new Aeon system. If non-UMD affiliated patrons have something from their own personal collection that they need digitized, we’re not doing that right now. DCMR is currently working on developing personal digitization services only for the UMD community, and it’s for a fee. However, Robin is happy to provide vendor information for those non-UMD patrons that are seeking digitization services on non-UMD materials.

A follow-up question for Robin regarding the digitization of Libraries materials on patron request. For requests to digitize out of copyright materials, do you put these materials in Hathi Trust? And do you make sure they aren’t digitized and available online before filling the request?

  • Robin: requests to digitize out of copyright materials reach her after it’s clear they are not already available on Hathi Trust or elsewhere. After digitization, these materials are provided to the patron, but they are also uploaded to the Internet Archive. Robin and Nathan (and Jennie Levine Knies before him) are discussing taking all of our digitized material from the Internet Archive and also putting it into Hathi Trust.

Revisiting an earlier conversation on projects and communication. It’s quite an ad hoc process, and while hesitant to add a layer of administrative process, there is a need to formalize project reporting/management.

  • Babak said that DSS’ general approach to improving process around the Libraries has been to implement it within DSS first. This allows us to work out the bugs and to try new things on a small scale in case they don’t work out. That’s why the DSS project manager was just for DSS, and why DSS has ownership of the Libraries Basecamp account. If these tools are successful, and other divisions want to use them, then they are implemented on a wider scale. It’s more effective if new tools/processes spread this way instead of forcing people to adopt them, which can be met with resistance. An example of something DSS is currently testing is digital signatures. This will allow people to sign documents digitally and will cut down on printing paper forms. If successful within DSS, it could spread to other divisions as requested.

What roles do DSS play in projects that extend beyond the Libraries?

  • Babak described the process of becoming involved in large initiatives, such as Kuali OLE. The Dean of the Libraries is the first person approached. She consults with the associate deans to determine if we want to get involved. If we do, then people from around the Libraries will sit on various committees to contribute to the development of the tool/community. Sometimes we may take part in testing tools, even if we aren’t involved with community leadership. In terms of actual software development, we’re spread pretty thin to complete internal projects, so we try to contribute back to development communities, such as Fedora, when it coincides with internal projects.

Here’s Heidi’s evaluation capture:

Things that went well with this meeting:

  • Learned a lot
  • Great for DSS folk to hear what is on folks’ minds
  • Thank you Will & Uche for help with computer/remote access
  • Q&A was the best part
  • Elevator talks → add to new Libraries’ hire orientation
  • Glad project management was addressed
  • Thanks for streaming

Things you’d like to change for next time?

  • Throw your questions in a box
  • Other Divisions should do this too
  • Let people submit questions beforehand
  • If this is done again, it would be good to include a brief ppt of each group so that we know what they do.
  • Possibly an opportunity for DSS to address some issues that would make our jobs easier e.g. Such as when submitting help-desk tickets to be more descriptive
  • Break-out sessions for each group in DSS to answer questions
  • Q&A with front line staff

Stew of the month: April 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

We have received files for the 159 1/4″ open reel audiotape recordings from the WAMU Archives that were digitized by a vendor as part of the DIC digitization project proposal process; quality assurance will be completed over the next month and the recordings will be uploaded to UMD Digital Collections.

More than 300 recordings from Arthur Godfrey’s 1949-1950 radio shows are now available online in UMD Digital Collections (restricted to campus or VPN log-in from off campus due to copyright restrictions). These recordings are a small part of the Arthur Godfrey collection held by Special Collections, Mass Media and Culture. In 2012, Robin Pike worked with Chuck Howell, Carla Montori, and other support staff to prepare the wire recordings for digitization by a vendor; Joanne Archer, her GAs, and Bria Parker enhanced the minimal metadata after all the files were received in 2014; and Eric Cartier and Josh Westgard recently completed the ingest. The same vendor is currently digitizing 40 additional recordings as part of the FY15 DIC digitization project proposal process.

Digitization assistants digitized and provided images for the student posters presented in the Hornbake Library lobby on Maryland Day, as part of an assignment about the history of campus for the “MAC to Millennium: History of the University of Maryland” class taught by Anne Turkos and Jason Speck.

Historic Maryland Newspaper Project

The Historic Maryland Newspapers Project sent its first production batch to the digitization vendor earlier this month. The Catoctin Clarion, first published in 1871 in Mechanicstown (modern-day Thurmont), Maryland, is the first title to be digitized during this grant cycle. We will digitize the run ending in 1922.

Several representatives from DSS and Doug McElrath from Special Collections met with staff at the Maryland State Archives on April 6 to discuss the future of the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project and to begin making plans for digitizing content outside of the current National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Software Development

The project to update the Libraries’ Website to a Responsive Web Design based interface is progressing through the initial design phase.  We have completed wireframing and are now creating static HTML mockups using the Unify template.  These mockups are used as prototypes to select and refine the features and layout of the new site, in close coordination with the Web Advisory Committee.  You can follow our progress on the Website RWD Mockups page hosted in GitHub.

The first of two sprints to refactor the Exhibit website is complete.  We are converting the  Beyond the Battle: Bladensburg Rediscovered special collections exhibit into a generic Exhibit template which can be used to create multiple websites.  New, hosted websites for the Library of American Broadcasting Foundation and the Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities project are scheduled for release on June 1 using the new template.

After review of the Wufoo technical limitations we encountered for use in the online student application project, we have decided that trying to create a workaround using Wufoo will be too costly to create and maintain so we will implement the form in Drupal.  The disadvantages of this implementation are the increased developer time necessary to create the form and the inability of Human Resources staff to update the form at will.  This technical problem has put the project behind schedule so to make up time we will pull additional developers off of the Fedora 4 implementation in order to make up some ground.  Release of the production Fedora 4 instance will be delayed until June.  We did however fulfill our commitment to participate in community development of the new Fedora 4 Audit Service core feature.

User and System Support

Victoria Quartey with 3D printer
Victoria Quartey with 3D printer

User & Systems Support (USS) staff volunteered on Maryland Day 2015, showing Library visitors the “Maker” services that are available in the Libraries. In the lobby of Mckeldin, USS demonstrated 3D printing and 3D scanning. When visitors came into Mckeldin Library, they were welcomed by seeing miniature testudos printing from a 3D printer.  Many visitors were amazed and wanted to learn more about 3D printing. The printed testudos were handed out to the visitors which brought huge smiles to both parents and children. Many students were amazed that 3D printing is available in the Libraries. While some students started thinking about what they can send to have printed, other students were eager to learn how to get certified to use the Library 3D printers on their own.

3D scanning demo with Preston Tobery.
3D scanning demo with Preston Tobery.

The 3D scanning demo in the lobby was also very popular with the visitors of the library. Using a laptop and Xbox Kinect camera, approximately 80 visitors had 3D scans taken of them. Visitors were able to watch how the 3D scans were made, in real-time, on one of the lobby’s TV screens. Each visitor that was 3D scanned will receive a copy of their 3D scanned file through email. Another TV screen in the lobby featured a short video on the process of creating a 3D printed replica of the Jim Henson & Kermit statue that’s outside Stamp Student Union. A huge 3D printed model of the statue was displayed for all visitors to see.

USS staff were also present in the John & Stella Graves Makerspace, on the 2nd floor of Mckeldin Library, which was open from 10am -4pm during Maryland Day. Approximately 90 visitors stopped by that day. Many visitors were undergraduates in varying majors, such as special education, mechanical engineering, digital media and computer science. The diverse crowd of students, and other visitors, continued to support the idea of the non-exclusivity environment that’s in in the Libraries. The visitors were also interested in the other technologies and services the Libraries offered to the students and local community. There were discussions about the vinyl cutter, desktop 3D scanner, 3D printer and Oculus Rift that’s in the Makerspace. However, other services like the TLC Loner Program were discussed to let the visitors know that students could rent laptops, camcorders, iPads, and other equipment for their desired reason. Even though the Google Glass wasn’t included in the planned showcase, many visitors were still interested in it and wanted to try the device on. Many were amazed by the opportunity. Since, the 3D printer in the Makerspace was printing miniature testudos, some visitors were treated with a small training session and demo on the 3D printer. USS staff briefly showed them how to unload and reload the plastic filament, used the Makerbot desktop application, and how 3D prints are removed from the build plate.

The USS volunteers expressed that they enjoyed showing these Library services on Maryland Day. And the Library visitors seemed to enjoy it as well. Throughout the day, visitors and alumni not only expressed how surprised they were that the Libraries have these 3D Maker services, they also were surprised that they were currently available to all students. One visitor who works at a Library in California was surprised to see how advanced our Library is. And, one alumni even stated, “ I wish I would have stayed in school longer”.

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

MD-SOAR

The setup of the Maryland Shared Open Access Repository (MD-SOAR) continues to progress. DSS created a DSpace “sandbox” for the MD-SOAR institutional partners to begin getting familiar with the DSpace repository solution. Initial configuration of the production instance of DSpace was completed after two weeks of work by software developers. The completed repository is expected to be ready for individual institutions by June 15th for their own local “launches” of the repository. This is a 2-year pilot project that will provide a repository solution to many of the libraries within the consortium plus a few other Maryland academic libraries. It is very encouraging to see so many libraries working together in support of providing access to their collections in an open environment and for DSS to be able to support this kind of initiative based on our technical expertise and DSpace experience.

Support to USMAI

The CLAS team responded to 88 Aleph Rx submissions and 27 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in April. Amongst the service requests were continued work on setting up YBP shelf-ready orders from YBP and working with Morgan State on getting EBSCO Discovery Services configured for use at their campus.

Kuali OLE

Six members of USMAI libraries were nominated, and graciously agreed, to help with testing and evaluating Kuali OLE. The testers met with CLAS on April 23rd to begin discussing OLE and creating a plan for evaluating it on behalf of the consortium. The group will prepare a report to be presented to, and discussed with, the Council of Library Directors at their September meeting. Thank you to Audrey Schadt, Austin Smith, Betty Landesman, Conrad Helms, Virginia Williams, and Vicki Sipe for their participation.

CLAS continues to monitor and contribute to the progress of version 1.6 of OLE. Seven OLE tickets are currently assigned to members of the team. Once released, the team will install and configure the new version for local testing. Team member continue to attend weekly implementation meetings with other OLE partners as those institutions move closer to implementing OLE. There is a lot to be learned from these shared experiences!

Conferences, workshops and professional development

ETDG news: Eric Cartier will be rotating off as co-chair in May, having completed his one-year term. Eric and Liz solicited self-nominations for the next co-chair and will announce the new co-chair at the May 20 ETDG meeting.

Edible Book Fair: Hornbake Plaza
Edible Book Fair: Hornbake Plaza

Eric helped to organize the 3rd Annual Maryland Edible Book Festival on April Fool’s Day. The popular event occurred in front of Hornbake Library. DCMR staff contributed the following edible books: Things Fall Apart, Beer and Loafing in Las Vegas, and The Pound and the Curry

Heidi Hanson attended a program sponsored by USMAI’s User Experience subgroup. The program featured EBSCO’s VP of User Experience Kate Lawrence. She discussed UX tips and observations based on EBSCO’s ethnographic research on college students. Among the observations was “results are the new black”. Ask Heidi for details…

David Dahl presented at a Google Analytics program sponsored by the USMAI Reporting & Analytics subgroup. The program was well-received and also included a good discussion and lightning presentations from several others in the consortium. There is a lot of interest in making better use of web analytics amongst the consortium’s libraries.

Stew of the Month: March 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

We have received files for the remaining volumes of the University of Maryland Schedule of Classes that were digitized from microfilm; quality assurance will be completed over the next month and they will be uploaded to the Internet Archive. Eric Cartier uploaded 24 volumes of the AFL-CIO News (see photo below for an example with interesting metadata) and 29 volumes University of Maryland Schedules of Classes to the Internet Archive, both held in Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA), and digitized from print and received back last month. These digitization projects were funded through the DIC proposal process.

GeorgeMeaneyJerryLewis1967
Jerry Lewis presenting a plaque to AFL-CIO president George Meaney in 1967

Elizabeth Caringola submitted the sample batch of digitized microfilm for the 2014-2016 NDNP grant. After this sample is approved, she will start production batches of around 10,000 pages. Babak and Liz also submitted the first grant report for the 2014-2016 cycle to NEH and the Library of Congress detailing the progress with the project.

Liz has also been working with her students to promote interesting digital images from digitized Maryland newspaper pages available on Chronicling America by starting a Pinterest board.

Robin worked with Joanne Archer, Anne Turkos, and other SCUA staff to ship 3,446 photographs from the Diamondback newspaper photo morgue to a digitization vendor. This shipment is the first half of the first phase of the two-year project to digitize nearly 18,000 photographs. The project is funded through the DIC proposal process.

Digital Programs and Initiatives

Alice Prael has begun work on updating the current Best Practices for Digital Collections. The new Best Practices will improve the organization and functionality by moving from a standard document to a wiki platform and will be updated to include our newest projects, initiatives, and processes.

Early in the month, Josh Westgard attended the DuraSpace summit in Washington, DC, where discussion focused on Duraspace’s three main products, Fedora, DSpace, and VIVO, all of which are of interest to, or currently in use by the Libraries. He also participated in the community-driven Fedora 4 development process, including helping to draft the requirements for an audit service, and attending, along with colleagues from SSDR and Metadata Services, the DC Area Fedora Users Group meeting at the National Agricultural Library.

Software Development

Development of the new online student application submission form and supervisor database has continued. We have hit a technical snag in our new Wufoo form caused by a limit of 100 fields per form and the way that “fields” are counted so will need to create a workaround.  Implementation has begun on the supervisor database and workflow implemented in the Staff Intranet, Libi, implemented in Drupal.

Working with the Library Web Advisory Committee, we have established high-level objectives and major milestones for the Responsive Web Design (RWD) project for the Libraries’ Website. The timeline calls for planning during the Spring, implementation over the Summer, final testing and content updates in the Fall, and release scheduled for January, 2016. We have completed selection of Bootstrap as the RWD framework and Unify as our starting template, based in part on our successful use of both tools in the Beyond the Battle: Bladensburg Rediscovered special collections exhibit. The next step of creating wireframes for key page layouts is in progress.

Hippo CMS received improvements to its Solr Database feature, currently used only by the  SCPA Scores Database, laying the groundwork for several new databases, such as SCPA Recording, Maryland Digitized Newspapers, and Plant Patents.  Databases are in general chosen to be disseminated using this feature when they have simple metadata and little to no content requirements.  This is a lighter weight alternative to full ingest into Digital Collections.

We are finalizing preparations for bringing online the new Fedora Commons Repository version 4.  This soft release will target minimal services only, with no data migrated from the existing Fedora 2. By bringing the service up in production well before the full release, we will be able to incrementally test and add new procedures. This will increase reliability and confidence in the service when it comes time to bear the full weight of our digital collections.

User and System Support

In late February, the John and Stella Graves MakerSpace was asked to assist with making a few 3D printed items for an exhibit at the Shady Grove (Priddy) Library in March. Eileen Harrigton requested the 3D printed models of human and hominid skulls as a part of an interactive exhibit on evolution. By 3D printing actual scans of the fossils, attendees were able to pick up the models and get a better and closer look at the skulls.

Interestingly, Archeology and 3D printing/scanning have some things in common. Both utilize careful planning on removal of debris from the item. For 3D printed item, sometimes supports are printed and need to be removed after the printing is finished, a lot like the removal of debris and dirt around fossils.

1
Preston removing supports and rough edges on the 3D printed skull

3D scanning is also used in archeological dig sites. It is used to quickly record accurate positional details and measurements before removal, and full 3D scans after the item is removed from the ground.

2
A technician 3D scanning a human skeleton using a handheld 3D scanner
3
The actual 3D scan of the skeleton above

After the scan is complete, it can be imported into a modeling program like Autodesk Design to clean up the scan and make it ready for 3D printing. After the initial cleanup, the file can be exported to a .stl file (stereolithography) and printed.

4
A 3D scanned Homo Erectus skull being processed in Autodesk Design

 

The files that were requested came from a website that has many 3D scanned fossils. (http://africanfossils.org/) The models took approximately 20 hours in total to print and one hour to do finishing details like support removal.

5
The finished 3D printed skulls for the event. From left…Homo Sapien, Homo Habilis, Homo Erectus.

 

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

DSS has been working on an exciting opportunity with the consortium and a few other Maryland academic libraries to put together a shared institutional repository (IR). DSS presented a proposal to the consortium for a 2-year pilot, which was accepted. The IR will be named Maryland Shared Open Access Repository (MDSoar, for short). The partners of the shared IR will rely on DSS’ 10+ years of experience managing DRUM. Similar to DRUM, MDSoar will use DSpace as its repository platform. DSS staff are currently working with the IR partners to configure the IR with an anticipated launch date of June 15, 2015.

The CLAS team continues its work on the Kuali OLE initiative, participating in weekly meetings with other OLE implementation partners from around the world and developing a sandbox environment in support of College Park’s and USMAI’s testing and evaluation of OLE. In April, the team will welcome in six consortium volunteers to test and evaluate OLE for its potential as the next ILS for the consortium.

Members of the team also attended the USMAI Next Gen ILS Working Group meeting on March 11th to discuss OLE, Aleph, and the next steps for moving to a new ILS over the course of the next several years.

The CLAS team responded to 101 Aleph Rx submissions and 32 e-resource requests. Additionally, members of the team have worked with campuses on such initiatives as implementing single sign-on at Salisbury, enhancing workflows for reporting library fines and fees to the Bursars’ Office at University of Baltimore, and assisting with the UMBC’s transition to shelf-ready orders from YBP.

Staffing

Mark Hemhauser’s last day in the office was March 13th. He is heading to University of California at Berkeley to fill a role as Head of Acquisitions. We wish him the best and hope that he’ll send some good weather our way!

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Eric Cartier was interviewed by the hosts of Lost in the Stacks, “the one and only Research Library Rock’n’Roll show” on WERK 91.1 FM at Georgia Tech. The episode discussing audio digitization, the WMUC radio station and digitization project, and personal digital archiving aired on April 3.

Robin Pike co-proposed a pre-conference workshop called “Managing Audiovisual Digitization Projects” with consultant Joshua Ranger from AV Preserve and vendor George Blood from George Blood Audio, Video, and Film to the Society of American Archivists. She received confirmation that the workshop will be held on Monday, August 17, 2015 in Cleveland, OH as part of the annual conference pre-conference program.

Graduate Assistants Alice Prael (Digital Programs and Initiatives) and Amy Wickner (SCUA) found out they will be presenting their student poster “Getting to Know FRED:  Introducing Workflows for Born Digital Content” at the Society of American Archivists annual conference in August.

Liz Caringola recently achieved certification as a Digital Archives Specialist, a program is administered by the Society of American Archivists. Over the past two years, Liz has taken a variety of workshops and webinars on different aspects of digital archives and sat for the cumulative exam on February 24 in College Park.

Peter Eichman, Bria Parker, Ben Wallberg, and Joshua Westgard attended the Washington D.C. Fedora User Group Meeting on March 31 and presented to the group on the status of our Fedora 4 implementation.

Eric Cartier and Liz Caringola attended the Spring 2015 MARAC/NEA Joint Meeting in Boston from March 19-21.

David Dahl attended the ACRL 2015 Conference in Portland, OR from March 25-28. He presented as part of a panel entitled “A Tree in the Forest: Using Tried-and-True Assessment Methods from Other Industries”.

 

Stew of the Month: February 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Robin Pike received back from digitization vendors 98 digitized video recordings from the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange collection in from Special Collections in the Performing Arts (SCPA), and 25 volumes of AFL-CIO News and 29 volumes of the Schedule of Classes, both held in Special Collections in University Archives (SCUA). Eric Cartier will perform and manage quality assurance and ingest processes on these shipments over the next few months.

Eric Cartier and Josh Westgard collaborated to make more than 140 Madrigal Singers sound recordings available in UMD Digital Collections, digitized by a vendor in 2014. The Madrigal Singers collection is held in SCPA, and contains recordings from the UMD musical group who performed “vocal and instrumental music dating from the pre-Renaissance period to twentieth-century America” between 1958-1983.

Rachel digitizing_AliceinWonderland
Digitization Assistant Rachel Dook scanning books.
Rachel_cropping_quality checking_AinW
Rachel Dook rotating and cropping scans, and then doing a quality control inspection.

Digitization assistants began scanning covers, title pages, inscriptions, and selected illustrations for the upcoming Hornbake Library exhibit Alice 150 and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll – Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Graduate Assistants Alice Prael (Digital Programs and Initiatives) and Amy Wickner (SCUA) presented at the Emerging Technologies Discussion Group (ETDG) February meeting about their work with born digital workflows.  They have been testing the forensic workstation (FRED) and tools including BitCurator and the Forensic Toolkit Imager to determine the best process for handling born digital content. The attendees posed questions and incited a compelling conversation on legacy media and the challenges in working with born digital media.

A DRUM Roll Please! With the addition of 247 electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) from the fall 2014 semester, there are now more 10,000 ETDs in DRUM dating back to 2003. Check out some of the most recent research by UMD graduates here. Also, the Archive of Immigrant Voices from the Center for the New History of the New America has recently been added to DRUM. The Archive currently contains eleven recordings and transcripts of immigrant oral histories with many more scheduled to be added in the new future.

Software Development

WuFoo Connector enterprise integration tool for submitting WuFoo forms into SysAid and AlephRx was completed and released to production.

Hippo CMS 7.8.8-1 was released to production with several bug fixes and performance improvements, along with a slight refresh for the Digital Collections home page.

We have embarked on a year long effort to overhaul the Libraries’ Website, consolidated with the Libraries’ Website, Mobile, to provide a new Responsive Web Design based interface.  This new interface will allow for access to all website content on any device (desktop, tablet, and mobile) with navigation and display optimized for the particular screen size on each device.  Working with the Web Advisory Committee we established high level objectives for the project and major milestones.  Look for the new interface in January, 2016.

User and System Support

Since September 2014, The John and Stella Graves Makerspace has garnered a lot of interest and offers for events and demonstrations.  Recently, we were contacted by Professor Kari Kraus, an associate professor in the iSchool (College of Information Studies) and the Department of English.

Professor Kraus was interested in incorporating 3D printing into both her graduate and undergraduate classes. She is teaching ENGL 467: Computer and Text, an undergraduate English course with twenty-five students. She is also teaching INST 644: Introduction to Digital Humanities, an iSchool graduate course with eleven students. Both classes are reading a short story, written by Philip K. Dick’s, Pay for the Printer. The science fiction short story is based in a war-ravaged future, humanity has come to depend on an alien species known as the Biltongs, possessed of the ability to replicate items identically – although the copies only last for a short time. When the Biltongs become decrepit, the humans are forced to rediscover the skill of building. She wanted her classes to recreate some objects from the story using modeling software with a warping tool on our 3D printers.

Sandra and Preston demonstrating the 3D printer.
Sandra and Preston demonstrating the 3D printer.

On March 3rd and March 11th, 2015, Preston and Sandra gave an introductory course on 3D printing and scanning to both her undergraduate and graduate courses. They spoke about the different tools and devices on the Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printer, introduced Makerbot Desktop software, and other fundamentals teachings of 3D printing. Although, most of the students did not have any experience with 3D printing, they were engaged and eager for more knowledge. At every mention of different websites such as thingiverse, tinkercad, and mesh mixer, students followed along on their laptops. Even though Preston and Sandra talked about new-age technology, one student continued to use good ole’ paper and pen to write her notes. Preston and Sandra gave numerous opportunities to ask questions, re-explain a concept, or even become interactive with the printer by unloading and reloading the filament. There was a little bit of hesitation at first but students eventually warmed up and soon everyone wanted a turn. There was a slight issue with the printer which inhibited a student from doing one of the exercises. However, the problem was resolved and it became a teachable moment. Most students were amazed about the real-world applications of 3D printing such as producing prosthetic limbs. Sandra spoke about a certified user of the John and Stella Graves Makerspace, Luke, and his ability to print prosthetic hands for children who do not have them. A certified user is a patron who has proven their proficiency through a skill test.

Let me take a closer look at this 3D printed car. What can I do with the 3D printer?
Let me take a closer look at this 3D printed car. What can I do with the 3D printer?
Come to me 3D printed elephant, let me take a closer look...
Come to me 3D printed elephant, let me take a closer look…

For those who sat in on the class as an observer, most thought it was a very approachable learning experience. The content was deep but they were impressed to see their ability to stay in the moment to get the students to understand the concept of 3D printing.

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

The CLAS team responded to 94 Aleph Rx submissions (including keeping track of all those weather-related closings!) and 32 e-resource requests. Of note, David Wilt has been working with University of Baltimore to improve the process of getting fines and fees information out of Aleph and into their bursar’s financial system. Hans Breitenlohner has been working with Salisbury University to implement single sign-on (SSO) using Shibboleth.

Testing of Kuali OLE continues and February marked an important time as College Park’s implementation group got their first look at the “sandbox” OLE environment set up by CLAS. The sandbox environment is currently running version 1.5.6 and the team is looking forward to the release of version 1.6 soon. Team members participate in weekly implementation meetings where they learn from and help out other institutions working towards the implementation of OLE.

The migration of the Metalib application to a new virtual machine environment continues and is still on schedule for a production cut-over at the end of March.

Staffing

Nathan Putnam has now taken on the role of Acting Manager of Digital Programs and Initiatives (DPI) in the DSS Division; he will continue to be the manager of MSD in the CSS Division.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Robin Pike attended The Library Collective Conference in Knoxville, TN February 19-20, and presented on the panel “Finding a Way: Negotiation Tips and Tactics” about working with digitization vendors.

Publications

Graduate Assistant Alice Prael co-proposed a paper with SCUA GA Amy Wickner on their recent work with born digital media and workflows, which was recently accepted to the Practical Technology for Archives journal.

Visits

Pam Mitchem and her team from Appalachian State University Libraries, Boone, NC, are planning a digital scholarship center.  They identified the University of Maryland’s digital programs and initiatives as a model to investigate and visited College Park on a fact-finding expedition. Trevor Muñoz, Terry Owen and Josh Westgard met with the ASU team for a productive exchange.

Four members of the technology team at Archbishop Curley High School in Baltimore arranged a visit to us; they are planning to develop their traditional library into a Digital Media Resource Center. They were due to meet with Robin Pike, Eric Cartier, Carleton Jackson and Uche Enwesi on Friday 6th March but our Snow Day intervened and the visit was canceled. Perhaps they’ll be able to visit another day.