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Archelon 1.0 Release

We are pleased to announce the 1.0 release of Archelon, the new staff-only administrative interface for content in the UMD Libraries’ Fedora 4 repository. The Fedora 4 repository was released in production last August and Archelon is the first staff interface for content in Fedora 4.

The 1.0 release enables library staff in Special Collections and University Archives, Digital Conversion and Media Reformatting, Digital Programs and Initiatives, and other departments to search, browse, and download content in Fedora 4. In addition, a basic, embedded newspaper and image viewer is included in the 1.0 release. Archelon will be developed in an agile fashion, with many incremental releases over time, and upcoming releases will include more features in the newspaper viewer. Eventually, full content add/update capabilities will be available to users, beginning with version 2.0.

Digital Content in Archelon

The launch of Archelon coincides with the import of the digitized Diamondback student newspapers, which will be the first collection available on the new platform. Batch loading of 130,000 objects is currently underway, representing 3,500 issues spanning 1910 to 1971.  Working closely with stakeholders in Special Collections and University Archives, we have established that it is a priority to load content that is currently not available online, such as Katherine Anne Porter correspondence and Diamondback photos.  We will be working on loading this content through 2017 as well as migrating content from the existing Digital Collections repository.

Archelon’s Technology

Archelon 1.0 is built using Ruby on Rails and the Blacklight discovery interface.  The supporting infrastructure behind Archelon includes the previously released Fedora 4 repository and new additions of a Newspaper batch loader, IIIF image server using Loris, search/index service using Apache Solr 6,  and IIIF manifest server using pcdm-manifests.  The newspaper viewer is built using the Mirador IIIF image viewer.

What’s Up with the Name?

Archelon is named for the ancient genus of giant sea turtles Archelon, whose name means “ruler turtle” in Greek. Archelon lived approximately 80.5 million years ago in the shallow seas that covered most of North America at the time. It is the largest ever recorded species of turtle by size, and second largest by weight.

Acknowledgements

The Fedora 4 repository implementation team would like to thank everyone in Digital Systems and Stewardship and throughout the University Libraries whose technical and administrative support made this effort possible.

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Stew of the month: January 2017

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Robin Pike and Rebecca Wack visited with the Montgomery Country Historical Society and the Greenbelt News Review in the hopes of partnering in future NDNP grant cycles. Greenbelt, which will be celebrating its 80th anniversary at the end of the year, was particularly excited to learn that the first six years of the Greenbelt Cooperator, 1937-1943, will be in the first batch of microfilm reels to be digitized in grant cycle 3.

Students have continued collation work to prep for cycle 3 digitization with 5 titles and over 40,000 sheets completed, including Greenbelt Cooperator, Czas Baltimorski, and Frostburg Mining Journal.  The first batch of duplicated microfilm has been returned from the duplication vendor, and two sample reels were sent to the digitization vendor for digitization and metadata tagging.

Synergies Among African American History and Culture (AADHum)

Scott Pennington and student Cecilia Franck inspected the 1,460 files from the pilot project, which they approved. Pennington will deliver the files to the Driskell Center and MITH for use in the upcoming digital humanities incubators. Pennington has also been meeting with campus subject experts to discuss material selection for the full project, consisting of approximately 38,540 pages. He will also be meeting with MITH postdoctoral associates Justin Hosbey and Jovonne Bickerstaff to refine content selection.

Other Digitization Activities

Robin Pike led the Digitization Initiatives Committee (Joanne Archer (SCUA), Mary Dulaney (Development Office), Eileen Harrington (PSD), Carla Montori (Preservation and Conservation)) in the prioritization of project proposals for FY18. The committee will meet again in February to finalize the budget and project selection.

Pike began working with Vin Novara (SCPA) on a Council of Library and Information Resources Recordings at Risk grant proposal to digitize 142 tapes from the Robert Sherman Collection from the “Woody’s Children” program, a radio broadcast program that featured folk music.

Cecilia Franck inspected and approved a quarter of the 12,070 Maryland Agricultural Census files, which were digitized from microfilm as part of the DIC’s project proposal process for FY17.

Digitization Assistant Karina Hagelin transferred 125 Third Rail Radio recordings on CD-Rs, from the fourth of six binders of CD-Rs in our WMUC college radio collection.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

GA David Durden began an internal electronic records inventory creation project, working with Andrea White and Angie Ohler.

Data Services

In coordination with USS, UMD Libraries’ REDCap application has been upgraded to version 7.0.5, adding several new features, as well as security and stability updates. Some of the newest features available to researchers include:

  • Live filters for reports; project XML export; CDISC ODM compatibility
  • Added Bootstrap framework for responsive design
  • New action tags and hook functions
  • Server-side field validation; Enhanced radio buttons and checkboxes for surveys
  • New API methods; Vertical sliders; Custom event labels
  • Account Manager user type
  • Improvements for composing logic/calculations
  • Infinitely repeating forms/events + minor facelift

GA David Durden researched and implemented a formal test plan for this application.

Digital Collections

In January the batch-loading application for our Fedora repository was completed, and we have begun testing the loading of content into Fedora 4. This is a significant milestone that will allow the Diamondback (130,000 objects representing 3500 issues) to be loaded in February.

ArchivesSpace

Working together with Bria Parker and Joanne Archer, Josh Westgard completed DPI’s transformation script for preparing our Encoded Archival Description XML files for ingest into the ArchivesSpace system. Ultimately, migration to this new system gives the Libraries numerous benefits. In the short term, it will allow us to retire several legacy home-grown systems for managing SCUA’s collections, and will give curators more direct control of how their collections are described. Additionally, by implementing a widely-adopted system for archival collection management, we will be able to tap into a rich community of administrators, developers, and experts for support and extended functionality. We are planning now to make finding aids in ArchivesSpace publicly accessible and discoverable in 2017.

DRUM

New Theses and Dissertations Added to DRUM

One hundred seventy-nine electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) from the fall 2016 semester were deposited in DRUM bring the total to 12,442. If you’re looking for a good late-night read, check out some of new titles at http://hdl.handle.net/1903/3.

OA Fund Closed for 2016-2017

Funds for the UMD Libraries’ Open Access Publishing Fund have been exhausted for this fiscal year, and we are no longer accepting applications. For 2016-2017, the Libraries only paid 50% of the article processing charges and funded 23 articles. Pending approval, applications will open in August for 2017-2018. Please contact Terry Owen (towen@umd.edu) if you have any questions.

Software Development

Fedora 4 Content Repository – Development of the infrastructure to support the our initial Fedora 4 collection, UMD Student Newspapers, is nearing completion.  In addition to the core repository we are working on these components: Newspaper batch loader, IIIF image server using Loris, search/index tuning using Apache Solr 6,  IIIF manifest server using pcdm-manifests, and Archelon, the administrative interface for Fedora 4.  Design planning is also underway for the public interface implementation using Hippo.

Annual Staffing Request – Libraries’ managers have begun entering their staffing requests for FY18 into the production application.  Work continues on version 1.1 containing administrative functionality to be released in early February.

Student ApplicationsVersion 1.0.0, containing the student submission functionality, and version 1.1.0, containing the supervisor review functionality, were both released in January, marking the completion of the initial implementation project.

Reciprocal Borrowing – Version 1.0.0  of the new Reciprocal Borrowing application was released into production for use by Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA) institutions, plus the University of Chicago, to provide reciprocal borrowing privileges to current faculty, emeritus faculty, students, and staff at the other member libraries.

Hippo – The upgrade to version 10 was completed in time for the start of the new semester.  The upgrade brings a new look and feel to the CMS interface and some behind the scenes changes to the CMS implementation.  Hippo is also continuing to build out its relevance module which provides features such as personalization and experiments.  We plan to begin investigating these features once we are on Hippo version 11.

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

Support to USMAI

The CLAS team responded to 126 Aleph Rx submissions and 29 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in January.

Loyola Notre Dame Library

The migration of LNDL’s Voyager ILS data to USMAI’s Aleph ILS was completed on January 10th, allowing LNDL to commence with Aleph as their new ILS on January 11th. It is surely a big adjustment for LNDL but all reports indicate that the migration has been successful.

The final extract of Voyager bibliographic data was received in December and loaded into Aleph over the winter break. On January 6th, the final extract of circulation and patron data was pulled from Voyager. At that point LNDL ceased all circulation activities in Voyager.

A few post-migration tasks were identified during the course of the migration. Configuration of loan notifications, loading of vendor data, and revisions to USMAI’s ticketing systems were completed following the migration completion.

EZproxy upgrade

An upgrade to the current version of EZproxy (v6.2.2) was completed in January for all campuses. The upgrade enables continued compatibility with changing security protocols as vendors and publishers look to end use of older, less secure protocols. The upgrade was completed with minimal interruption to users.

MDsoarLOGO

MD-SOAR

Additional enhancements were made to MD-SOAR to provide better guidance on the selection of a Creative Commons license and to offer clearer help text for fields in the item submission form.

DSS developed a proposal to continue MD-SOAR beyond the end of its two-year pilot. The pilot is scheduled to end in June 2017. To date, over 2200 items have been added to MD-SOAR. More than 18,000 users have visited the repository.

Staffing

Rebecca Wack began work as the Digital Projects Librarian, the project manager for the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project in DCMR. Rebecca earned her MA in Film and Media Studies from the University of Rochester in 2014 and a BA in Cinema Studies from the University of Central Florida. She has worked as a grants specialist and a digitization project manager at the University of Central Florida where she helped to set up the UCF Home Movie Archive, and has also worked as a digitization project manager with the Seward Project at the University of Rochester.

Digitization Assistants Kelsey Hughes and Suzy Wilson left DCMR for other opportunities. Kelsey accepted an internship at the Smithsonian, and Suzy is working still at UMD Libraries, now in Teaching and Learning Services.

Xianghui Dong began work in SSDR as R software developer for NSF Advances in Biological Informatics grant.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

The Association for Recorded Sound Collections Program Committee accepted Eric Cartier’s presentation proposal “The Writer’s Voice: The Sound Recordings of Katherine Anne Porter.” Eric managed the in-house digitization of the open reel audio tapes from the Porter collection, managed the quality review of thousands of digitized pages of her personal correspondence, and has since read Porter’s entire body of work, which will be featured in this presentation.

Heidi Hanson attended ALA Midwinter in Atlanta, GA from January 21st to 24th.

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Stew of the month: December 2016

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Robin Pike received the sample (four duplicated reels) from the microfilm duplication vendor. The reel of vinegar film did not meet 100% standards despite the additional manual work of the vendor. Pike worked with Maria Day of the Maryland State Archives (MSA) on selecting additional microfilm for the first half the project, making substitutions for the microfilm with vinegar syndrome. MSA staff are looking into alternative film throughout January; if other film cannot be located, the project will probably not digitize The Evening Capital during grant three.

Pike and Doug McElrath (SCUA) met with subject liaison librarians to inform them about Chronicling America http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/ and the titles available from the State of Marylandhttp://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/awardees/mdu/. They also discussed the popular new API http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/about/api/ which allows partial or full data harvest for analysis: Pike prepared an information sheet for the liaisons which includes general information and subject-specific information.

Pike also began updating the project website http://www.lib.umd.edu/digital/newspapers/home to reflect some of the changes and additions of grant three.

Pike continued to work on the proposal for the digitization vendor contract.

Synergies Among African American History and Culture (AADHum)

The pilot project digitized files for AADHum were received from the vendor. Students will soon begin to perform quality assurance on the files.

Other Digitization Activities

Digitization assistants Becca Mena and Suzy Wilson inspected 50 general athletics videos and 41 Gymkana digitized video files from a vendor. The original media ranged between VHS, U-matic, Betacam, BetacamSP, and DVD-R. The Athletics project was funded through the DIC project proposal process and the Gymkana digitization was funded by a UMD Launch fundraiser through the School of Public Health.

Working with Preservation and Conservation, Pike received the drive of files for the earliest iterations of The Diamondback, which were produced by the conservation vendor while they were stabilizing the damaged originals. After inspection, these files will be sent to the digitization vendor for post-processing to the metadata specifications as the rest of the project.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Save the Date: “Terps Publish” Student Publishing Fair

In collaboration with University Archives and Library Communications, DPI is pleased to announce the first Terps Publish: Student Publishing Fair will be held on April 11, 2017. Terps Publish is designed to showcase student publishing activity at UMD, and foster discussion about the challenges and opportunities student publishers encounter. The event will provide student publishers with a hosted roundtable to connect with peers and library resources for publishing and will also feature a fair to promote and celebrate student publishing activities. The program is modeled on similar initiatives at Georgetown University, Ohio University, and Dartmouth College. Stay tuned for more details, including participating student publications.

Software Development

Fedora 4 Content Repository – Completed the upgrade to version 4.7 which represents a significant change to Fedora’s underlying persistence implementation.

Annual Staffing RequestVersion 1.0 was released into production and Libraries’ mangers have begun entering their staffing requests for FY18.  Work continues on version 1.1 containing administrative functionality to be released in January.

Student Applications – The final changes for version 1.0 containing the application submission interface were decided on based on user testing and implementation is nearing completion for a January release.

Hippo – Initial development on the version 10 upgrade and promotion process was completed and version 10 was promoted to the staging site for user testing.

User and System Support

User and System Support (USS) is testing out Microsoft Windows 10 and planning to deploy Windows 10 to a few staff for testing in a few weeks.  Windows 10 is little different when it comes to the look and feel of the Graphical User interface so we hope to learn more from library staff that have agreed to help with testing.

USS is currently investigating the use of VMWare Horizon/ Mirage desktop virtualization application, as a tool for managing our windows machines in the libraries public and staff environment. Compared to Citrix, VMWare Horizon/Mirage Desktop virtualization is less expensive while also more rewarding than other desktop virtualization solutions.

The virtual desktop environment limits the number of hardware related issues end users face and the response time for our end users is considerably improved. Library support staff would be able to get end users up and running in a matter of minutes instead of the hours it takes to re-image a machine. Software deployment would also be quicker and be possible without a re-image of the end machine. Also the Virtual environment decreases the cost of machine upgrades. Ends users can pull up fully functional workstations from bare minimum mini PCs, which are less expensive and more easily maintained than a computer.

Staffing

Dwonne Knight and Kayode Bamidele joined DSS as IT Support Assistants working in User and System Support.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Kate Dohe and Ben Wallberg attended the Coalition for Networked Information fall meeting in Washington, DC on December 12-13.

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R software development for NSF Advances in Biological Informatics grant

We are pleased to announce that as part of our software services program Xianghui Dong has joined Digital Systems and Stewardship in a new contract position of R Software Developer.  This position will provide programming in support of an NSF Advances in Biological Informatics grant entitled Advanced mathematical, statistical, and software tools to unlock the potential of animal tracking data with a  project team composed of researchers from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, University of Maryland Department of Biology, and University of Massachusetts (Amherst) College of Information and Computer Sciences.

Xianghui received his BA in Mechanics and Manufacturing Engineering from Tsinghua University and PhD in Pattern Recognition and Intelligent Systems from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  Xianghui has worked most recently as a consultant with some non-profit organizations, as well as volunteer work as a data ambassador for DataKind DC.

This project focuses on adapting mathematical and statistical methods from geostatistics, physics, signal processing, and computer science for the analysis of animal tracking datasets. The centerpiece of the project is the continuous-time movement modeling (ctmm) analysis package for the R environment for statistical computing. This package implements the methods developed by the project team and serves as the interface with the community of ecologists and conservation biologists studying animal movement processes.

The developer will build an R-Shiny web application providing a graphical interface to the ctmm R package for statistical modeling with a target audience of ecologists who have animal movement data and would like to utilize the ctmm package, but don’t have the expertise to do so directly in R via the command line. The application will walk the user through the modeling process, including steps such as data upload, analysis, visualization and report generation. The analysis step will further be broken into a sequence of sub-steps that depend on the user’s analysis goals. The web application must be easily run in standalone, desktop mode and would be desirable run in a hosted, multi-user mode as well. The developer will principally interface on the backend with the existing ctmm package, developed by others on the project team, but would also be available to help with ctmm improvements as necessary.

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Stew of the month: November 2016

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Rebecca Wack will be joining the project as the new Digital Projects Librarian, the project manager for this project, starting on January 9.

Robin Pike and Doug McElrath (SCUA) hosted members of the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project Advisory Board, and affiliated members, on November 17. The team discussed the progress of the first two grants, the plans for title digitization in the third grant, ideas for educational outreach and other programming, and collaborative ideas or statewide events to promote the digitized newspapers in Chronicling America.

Coming out of this conversation, Pike worked with GA David Durden on a short-term project to identify educational opportunities for integration in K-12 and higher education curriculums in the state, genealogical tutorials, and other opportunities. This work will be used by the new Digital Projects Librarian as she begins to structure the outreach initiatives for the project.

Pike received half of the microfilm from the Maryland State Archives, but some of the microfilm was slightly deteriorated. Pike is working with the microfilm duplication vendor to see if the film is too deteriorated to be reproduced and digitized, in which case, the project will select a backup title. The microfilm duplication vendor is working on the sample before they proceed with the first batch of film duplication.

Students Kerry Huller and Sara Horn continued to collate metadata for the titles selected.

McElrath (SCUA), Judi Kidd, and Amy Wickner (SCUA) completed their research of title copyright and found that none of the titles selected were ever registered for copyright, meaning that we can include them in this project.

Synergies Among Digital Humanities and African American History and Culture

Scott Pennington worked with Jen Eidson (SCUA) and Catherine Knight Steele (MITH) to begin selection of materials for the full project, beginning with processed parts of the collection. The project’s primary difficulty is knowing where to search in the unprocessed parts of the collection for materials relevant to this project, and that much of these unprocessed materials are stored in an off-site location.

Other Digitization Activities

Pike met with Mary Dulaney, the Libraries’ new Director of Development, to discuss digitization project and initiative fundraising priorities for the next few years.

Pike consulted with several staff members from The Phillips Collection on a grant they submitted to the Institute of Museum and Library Services to digitize the archival collections relating to their art collections and ingest these records into a new repository. If the grant is successful, Pike will also serve as Lead Project Advisor, providing her expertise on mass-digitization projects.

Liz Caringola (SCUA) finalized the FY16 Diamondback project; the files were sent to DPI and SSDR for ingest into Fedora 4.

Pike worked with Laura Schnitker (SCUA) and Joanne Archer (SCUA) to deliver over 150 tapes from the Maryland Public Television archives collection to a vendor for digitization. Pike worked with Kelley O’Neal (HSSL), Amy Wasserstrom, Kirsten Gaffke (SCUA), Carla Montori, Bryan Draper, and Meg Garnett, and GA Jenna Zimmerman (Preservation) to prepare and coordinate a courier shipment of general collection maps and Prange posters to a vendor. Pike worked with Linda Sarigol (LMS), Bria Parker (MSD), and Joanne Archer (SCUA) to send a large shipment of films from LMS and SCUA to the digitization vendor. All of these projects were funded through the DIC FY17 digitization project proposal process.

Student digitization assistants scanned 85 historical French pamphlets, totaling 718 pages, which Eric Cartier uploaded to the Internet Archive.
Cartier uploaded nine born-digital UMD Graduate Catalogs, totaling 7,218 pages, to the Internet Archive. This completes the 2001-2016 run.
Cartier and DCMR student assistants received and inspected 199 audio recordings from the Contemporary Music Project, 59 videos from the Jackson R. Bryer Interview Collection, and 15 videos from the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners America archives. These projects were funded by the DIC FY17 project proposal process.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Kate Dohe and GA David Durden presented an overview of Research Data Services to the University Library Council at their November meeting.

Software Development

Fedora 4 Content Repository – Began upgrade to version 4.7.  This release represents a significant change to Fedora’s underlying persistence implementation.  The initial Diamondback Newspaper Collection load will take place into production on 4.7 once it has been promoted.

Annual Staffing Request – Release 1.0 re-rescheduled for December 5 for managers to begin entering their staffing requests for FY18.  We will then work on completing the administrative functionality for release in January.

Student Applications – Development of the application submission interface is nearing completion and will be moving into user testing in December.

Hippo – Initial development on the version 10 upgrade is nearing completion and we have started work on the promotion processing.  Hippo 10 is expected to be promoted to the staging site for user testing in December.

Hippo implementation of new Libi – Development continues on the backend Box/Hippo/Solr integration component.  The Libi Advisory Team has requested a hold on interface development while they review the proposed new information architecture with Libraries’ stakeholders; resumption is excepted to take place in February.

Reciprocal Borrowing – See our blog post for information on this new project.

Administrative Tracking Tools – As part of our software services program DSS is continuing its partnership with the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) with a collaboration to cleanup the codebase and enhance the functionality of SESYNC’s Administrative Tracking Tool.
 

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

Support to USMAI

The CLAS team responded to 82 Aleph Rx submissions and 29 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in November.

Loyola Notre Dame Library

Work continued on the project to migrate LNDL from Voyager to Aleph. The majority of work focused on completing analysis, mapping, and clean-up of LNDL’s bibliographic data and beginning to load that data into USMAI’s Aleph development environment. A full load of bibliographic data is anticipated for completion in early December.

Additionally, initial testing of circulation rules and related scheduled jobs was performed. Their OPAC presence has also been set up in the development environment.

The migration is scheduled for completion in the first half of January.

MDsoarLOGO

MD-SOAR

MD-SOAR was upgraded to version 5.6 of DSpace in November.

Additionally, several interface changes are in development based on recommendations from usability testing by USMAI’s User Experience subgroup. Once development is completed, these will be released to MD-SOAR partners for review before moving the changes to MD-SOAR.

Joseph Koivisto implemented a new Google Tag Manager script to capture the institution name for bitstream downloads that originate within MD-SOAR, which will help with instituion-specific reporting.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Kate Dohe, Joseph Koivisto, Trevor Munoz, and Robin Pike attended the Digital Library Federation Forum and Digital Preservation 2016 in Milwaukee, WI from November 7-10, 2016. Dohe, Munoz, and Pike also gave presentations, which can be found in the Open Science Framework repository.

Kate Dohe attended and presented at the Charleston Conference in Charleston, SC from November 2-4.

Heidi Hanson attended the 2016 LITA Forum in Fort Worth, TX from November 17-20, 2016.

Visits

Eric Cartier met with Shannon Willis, the Digital Projects Lab Manager at the University of North Texas, to give her a tour of the Hornbake Digitization Center and to share documentation.

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DSS Town Hall

On 1st December, DSS held a Town Hall meeting in the Special Events Room of McKeldin Library; all UMD Library staff were invited to attend. Questions were submitted prior to the meeting via an online form with the opportunity for in-person questions on the day.

The meeting began with an introduction by Trevor Munoz since Babak Hamidzadeh was unable to attend. This interactive conversation between DSS and other divisions is supported by a monthly blog: DigiStew.

Department updates followed

Robin Pike – DCMR [Digital Conversion & Media Reformatting]  

  • Digitization projects for FY17 are on track
  • Rebecca Wack, Digital Projects Librarian, will begin work in January
  • Scott Pennington continues to manage a Mellon Grant funded digitization project
  • Eric Cartier has been planning 2017 in-house digitization
  • Mary Dulaney is assisting with fundraising opportunities

Kate Dohe – DPI [Digital Programs & Initiatives]

  • The cross-divisional digital preservation team is due to report in early 2017.
  • Josh Westgard has been working on migrating content into ArchiveSpace
  • E-publishing: one faculty and one student-run journal will be published
    • Terps Publish is a new student publishing event to be piloted in 2017
  • ICDL and the Health Equity repository is near completion

Ben Wallberg – SSDR [Software Systems Development & Research]

  • An Annual Staffing Request application to replace spreadsheets will roll out next week. Andrea White will conduct training.
  • Hippo upgrades: version 10 is due in January, version 11 in the spring.  Hippo will release version 12 in the summer. This will bring us up to date; annual upgrades will follow.
  • Libi migration: development is paused while the Libi Advisory Team consult with, and get feedback from, divisions. Development work will resume in February. Two standalone applications, Student Applications and Idea Board, will be released next year.
  • Website stability has improved following work with USS on server improvements.

David Dahl – CLAS [Consortial Library Applications Support]

  • USMAI now has 17 members: Loyola/Notre Dame joined in the summer and their migration to Aleph is due for completion in January.
  • Aleph will be the ILS for the foreseeable future. CLAS is monitoring potential new systems.
  • The USMAI Data Collection and Analysis Working group will produce a report in January.
  • The pilot institutional repository is ending. Further plans are in progress.

Uche Enwesi – USS [User & Systems Support]

  • USS supports over 1000 machines and 60 printers
  • USS have have received over 7700 calls in the helpdesk and USS have closed over 5500 service requests.
  • Work continues with Div IT to manage desktop machines using SSCM to push out upgrades.
  • Makerspace: USS driven printing is decreasing while training is increasing: the trend is for self printing. Andy Horbal and Preston Tobery are working with professors to integrate 3-D printing into the curriculum.
  • The public and TLC machines have been upgraded; staff upgrades are now in line.
  • Researching VDI technology to deploy a new machine image quickly and smoothly.
  • Researching Mobile printing for smart-phones and tablets is being investigated for used with pay for print.
  • Additional training on Google Suite will take place in December.
  • Exploring the possibility of Windows 10 for staff and public use.  Asking staff if they are interested to test out Windows 10 to contact DSS helpdesk.

Trevor Muñoz – MITH [Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities]

  • Synergies among African American History and Culture, and Digital Humanities (AADHUM) multi-year initiative
  • Digital Humanities incubators (part of AADHUM): training begins in January
  • Documenting the Now – social media research continues

Next, managers answered questions that were submitted ahead of time

Q Do we know everything DSS does so we can say which ones need to be discontinued? What are DSS priorities?

Judi read out Babak’s response:

We have a list of projects and all managers are aware of their initiatives and operations. Our priorities really boil down to what the units in DSS do. Much of what DSS does is driven by priorities and demand from other Divisions and is coordinated with other divisions.

Q Everything in the Libraries nowadays is technology related. Sometimes decisions are made in DSS without any input from the rest of the Libraries. Sometimes it feels as if DSS is very self-centric and makes decisions for all of us without any input.

Judi read Babak’s answer:

The bulk of what DSS does is driven by priority and demand from other divisions in Libraries. There are projects that DSS initiates, within its mandate, with other units on Campus, or on its own as part of a known DSS service. There may be cases where better communication and coordination is needed. If those cases are raised, we would appreciate it and will try to respond to them and improve communication.

Q Why is the ITD sign still on the main stairwell door?

Judi: a new sign has been ordered.

Q What is the status of upgrade to Fedora 4? And the upload of the backlog of materials that are ready for entry into University AlbUM?

Kate: The Diamondback has been released to DPI and will be imported into Fedora 4.

Migration of existing content is being planned for 2017; stakeholders are being consulted.

Partnering with SSDR:

  • The Fedora 4 administrative interface for collection managers, tentatively named Archelon, is due early in 2017.
  • Work continues on a newspaper viewer enabling users to clip, download a newspaper article and use OCR with the image. A demo is coming soon. The intent is to repurpose this open source software for other applications.

DPI, USS and SSDR analysed Fedora 4 storage needs and solutions: recommendations are due in 2017.

Q I’d like to know about the role of the data services librarian (i.e. Karl’s old position). This type of service is interesting and I am always looking to learn more about library/researcher collaboration/interaction.

Kate: The search is underway; this position is intended to play an active role in data management serving the needs of Maryland faculty.

Q I think DSS should help us develop a more comprehensive tool for analyzing our subscribed resources – databases and journals. The work that was led by Mark Hemhauser was great, but needed tweaking. This year’s serials review abandoned the great work that Mark started, and it was a step back. We are spending so much money on collections, and it is sad that we are not trying to do some more comprehensive evaluation of the use, cost, etc. Mark’s work was a good start. What happens after a person has left the organization?

Ben:

  1. How do we support applications that are not ready to go into full production? Send in a helpdesk ticket if you would like to set up a sandbox or trial to see whether you like an application. No support or backups are provided with sandboxes; it is a quick way to see how an application works. If the sandbox test is successful, then full production is considered.
  2. Tracking applications: we write a Service Level Agreement [SLA]. This is a process for both parties to set out expectations, timelines and periodic reviews. Documentation is amended when a person leaves the Libraries.
  3. In this case the documentation shows that the application started as a pilot, moved into production, was monitored, assessed and data was downloaded. Stakeholders agreed to decommission the production application.

David: The USMAI Data Collection and Analysis working group have conducted an initial investigation of USMAI’s data needs for reporting and assessment purposes. USMAI’s new Acquisitions & Licensing Coordinator is leading an initiative to identify an ERM [Electronic Resource Management system] to aid license management and cost analysis.

Q Is Aleph here to stay? What happened with testing on circ/print functions before the upgrade to Aleph v22?

David: The short answer is yes, Aleph, is here to stay. An email update was distributed this morning with more details. CLAS team continue to maintain and enhance Aleph to support the consortium’s work.

Aleph upgrade:

  • First upgrade in 6 years; CLAS carried out a review of the migration.
  • Each USMAI campus has responsibility for testing locally
  • Future upgrades will emphasise the need for local testing, especially for printing and unique workstation setups.

Q  Messages from DSS to USMAI are not conveyed to Library staff. Only people subscribing to the USMAI reflector get to know them. Shouldn’t someone inform UMD Libraries Staff of USMAI initiatives/updates/etc?

David:

  • The CLAS team communicate with USMAI; each USMAI campus communicates with its staff
  • UMD Campus Contacts are Angie Ohler and Tim Hackman
  • Circulation, electronic resources, and other functional contacts should use judgement to forward to Library staff as necessary. Any staff member may join USMAI Communities of Interest, which are listed on the USMAI Staff Site (usmai.umd.edu/groups)
  • CLAS is looking at our systems for facilitating communication and collaboration within the consortium

Q When will you transfer the conference rooms from Exchange to Google Calendar?

Uche: this has already happened. Room owners have been contacted by USS.

Q I would like you to confirm times for on-site and/or virtual Help Desk visits (re: troubleshooting, software updates, hardware replacement)

Uche: USS contact staff via email and leave a phone message if necessary. In cases where Div IT inform of a security issue, USS will take control immediately.  In case where we do not need the user input, USS staff will take control and fix the problems.

Q I would like you to make sure staff images have up-to-date versions of software (ILLiad, Ares, etc.) so that we don’t need to submit upgrade tickets for new machines / new staff.

Uche: We are working with Div IT to use SSCM which will push out upgrades so that all machines have the same image.

Q Why do you close helpdesk tickets before confirming that the problem has been resolved?

Uche: Let Uche or Cece know if this happens to you. Re-open the helpdesk ticket if necessary.

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African American History and Culture and Digital Humanities

The Libraries began their involvement in the Mellon Foundation grant project Synergies Among Digital Humanities and African American History and Culture in May 2016. This project is a collaboration between the College of Arts and Humanities, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), the Libraries, and the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora. In July, Scott Pennington was hired as the Digitization Project Manager for the project, working with the AFL-CIO collection in SCUA and the David C. Driskell papers, a collection of the artist, scholar, curator, collector, and philanthropist, in the Driskell Center. The project seeks to digitize primary source materials for study by post-doctoral students and other researchers examining the intersection of African American History and Culture.

Scott Pennington, Jen Eidson (SCUA), Stephanie Smith (Driskell Center), Purdom Lindblad (MITH), and Jovonne Bickerstaff (MITH) went through materials looking for items of interest to researchers involved in the upcoming Digital Humanities Incubator sessions to be hosted as part of the larger project. Approximately 1,000 pages were selected for a pilot digitization project and were shipped to the vendor for digitization on November 1, 2016. These materials will be available to researchers and to the public through the Digital Humanities Incubator projects in January, as well as through UMD Digital Collections.

Scott Pennington is currently working with Jen Eidson, Stephanie Smith, and MITH to select an additional 39,000 pages for the full project, to be shipped to the digitization vendor in April.

Samples of content selected for digitization are featured below:

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