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You’re Invited to the Historic Maryland Newspapers Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on May 2!

Today’s post is by Amy Wickner, student assistant and iSchool field study for the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project.

As part of an ongoing initiative to connect digital collections with Wikipedia, the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project (HMNP) will co-host a  Wikipedia Edit-a-thon (May 2, 1-4pm) focusing on Maryland newspapers. We’ve set up an event page and advance registration form (strongly recommended) with all the details.

Photo from HMNP’s last edit-a-thon on August 18, 2014, at UMD Libraries.

Liz Caringola and I are working with special collections staff at the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis, who have been kind enough to provide space, computers, and guided tours of their collections. Maria Day and Allison Rein from MSA will highlight historic newspapers in their collections, while Liz will introduce edit-a-thon participants to Chronicling America and HMNP’s ongoing work. I’ll give short tutorials on editing Wikipedia and adding images to Wikimedia Commons. We’re hoping to draw participants from across the state and DC / Baltimore metro areas. All are welcome, and word-of-mouth promotion would be much appreciated.

Many edit-a-thon pages have a Goals section, conventionally a list of articles needing to be drafted, added, or improved. Our page has such a list, but we’d also like to help participants depart with at least some impulse to continue editing Wikipedia. (We’ll have a day-of participant survey of some kind to get at what brings people to our event.) Sparking a lifelong passion for editing Wikipedia using archival material as evidence would of course be fire, but growing sustainable participation more realistically involves a lot of small steps. Which is why it’s exciting to see that this is just one of many DC-area Wikipedia events this spring, with themes ranging from accessibility to labor to #ColorOurHistory.

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Stew of the month: February 2016

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Issues of Der Deutsche Correspondent (Baltimore) from 1914, 1915 (Jan. – March), 1916, and 1917 (Jan. – Sept.) are now available on Chronicling America: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045081/issues/. These issues were digitized in partnership with the Maryland Historical Society and expand upon the years digitized during our first National Digital Newspaper Project grant, 1858-1913. Remaining issues will be digitized before the end of the current grant to complete the newspaper’s run, which ceased publication in 1918.

Other Digitization Activities

DCMR staff performed quality assurance on the second batch of books and serials digitized by the Internet Archive, which came from the general collections, William Kapell diaries, microfilmed correspondence from the Djuna Barnes papers, AFL-CIO News, and vinegar syndrome films from the Library Media Services collections, and finished QA on the School of Music audio recordings. All of these project were funded through the DIC project proposal process.

The following digitization projects were sent to vendors in February: Diamondback photos (shipment 1), Diamondback microfilm, Kapell photos, Kapell programs, Bryer videotapes, and an additional batch of SCUA publications to the Internet Archive.

Robin Pike met with Nevenka Zdravkovska, Josh Westgard, and Ben Wallberg to discuss moving the Plant Patent Database from a pilot project to production. EPSL staff will continue to scan the color images and Josh Westgard will continue to update the database.

Eric Cartier worked with DCMR students and Jen Eidson, Labor Collections Archivist, to digitize photos, documents, physical artifacts, and audio recordings for the 60th Anniversary of the AFL-CIO Merger exhibit.

David Durden worked with Josh Westgard to adapt a web-scraper script to pull and analyze usage statistics from UMD’s collection in the Internet Archive. David also continued to work on analyzing usage statistics from UMD Digital Collections between 2013-2015. This work may be used to inform future digitization priorities.

Software Development

We experienced problems with website performance and stability during January and February for a number of reasons, some of them related to outstanding technical issues with the server environment and some to new bugs in the code.  We’ve been working to upgrade the server infrastructure and eliminate those bugs, resulting in some improvements with additional work continuing through March.  These improvements will not only resolve the current problems but prepare for continued growth of website traffic.

We have started work on upgrading DRUM from DSpace version 4.1 to 5.4.  The basic benefits are to keep up-to-date with fixes and improvements.  In addition the upgrade sets the stage to explore new features like ORCID integration, report Google Analytics from admin UI, and SHERPA/RoMEO lookup during submission.

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

Support to USMAI

The CLAS team responded to 111 Aleph Rx submissions and 34 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in February.

Service Evaluation

As part of the CLAS team’s effort to make sure we’re meeting the consortium’s needs satisfactorily, we began soliciting feedback on your service requests starting in October 2015. Thank you to all who have responded to these requests for feedback! Responses have been overwhelmingly positive to date, and your comments are helpful in ensuring that we continue doing what you value and look for opportunities in other areas.

Aleph Upgrade

As part of the CLAS’ work plan for 2016, the team began planning for upgrading the consortium’s Aleph instance from version 20 to version 22. Team members reviewed release notes for versions 21 and 22 in order to assess the work involved in upgrading. Project details can be found on the USMAI Staff Site Version 21 & 22 Update page and will be updated as the project progresses.

CLAS Notes

Wondering how to reply to an Aleph Rx so that your response gets recorded, how to use Research Port URLs to link to databases, how Aleph fines are configured and calculated, or what to do if you find a problem with another USMAI campus’ record in Aleph? Lucky for you, these are all covered in the team’s CLAS Notes series, which you can find on the USMAI Staff Site.

Site Visits

Joseph Koivisto made visits to St. Mary’s, UMD Center for Environmental Science, and College Park to learn more about their needs and workflows related to library acquisitions. A few more visits are in the works in the coming months.

David Dahl, along with Chuck Thomas, visited with library staff at Frostburg.

MD-SOAR

MDsoarLOGO

The Maryland Shared Open Access Repository was upgraded to version 5.4 of DSpace in February. The repository has seen over 1300 sessions from 800+ viewers with an average session duration of more than 25 minutes and over 8300 items downloaded. Users find the repository in a number of ways, including Google, Google Scholar, and direct links from MD-SOAR partners’ library websites (even a few via social media posts!). We have some work in progress to help MD-SOAR partners gain even more insights about the repository’s use; we hope to share more about that soon!

Staffing

David Durden expanded his service to DCMR by accepting an hourly position in the Hornbake Digitization Center.

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Stew of the month: January 2016

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

The following DIC-funded digitization projects were sent to vendors in the months of December and January: LMS vinegar syndrome films across multiple subject areas, general collection books and serials, Persian textbooks, Maryland historical maps, posters from the Gordon W. Prange collection, and Djuna Barnes correspondence on microfilm. Working with LMS and Preservation and Conservation staff, three reels of film of Florence Days of Destruction were also sent to a digitization vendor.

DCMR staff began quality assurance on files delivered from digitization vendors for SCUA books and serials mass digitization and School of Music audio recording digitization projects. Both projects were funded through the DIC project proposal process.

Student digitization assistant Caroline Hayden scanned 82 University of Maryland campus maps and added them to UMD Digital Collections. The Assistant University Archivist put together this small project to illustrate how the campus has changed over time. 

Student digitization assistant Brin Winterbottom digitally converted 200 WMUC “Third Rail Radio” CD-Rs. These recordings will be added to 180 other WMUC live concert recordings that she and Rachel Dook transferred last fall.

DCMR staff digitized 55 photographs and programs for the upcoming Gymkana exhibit, which will be featured in the ground floor cases and Portico Room in McKeldin Library. 

Chair Balancing: Part of the Gymkana exhibition to be hosted in McKeldin Library

Chair Balancing: Part of the Gymkana exhibition to be hosted in McKeldin Library

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Two new titles digitized by the project went live on Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/) in late December. The St. Mary’s Beacon and Gazette from Leonard Town have been added and span from 1852 to 1921. Some scattered issues were microfilmed separately and will be digitized in a future batch. Additional issues of the Catoctin Clarion from Thurmont were also added, expanding coverage through 1922. (Issues from 1871 to 1918 were digitized earlier this year.)  Visit http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/?state=Maryland&ethnicity=&language= to browse all available Maryland titles.

Liz Caringola, Robin Pike, and Doug McElrath (SCUA), with assistance from Tonita Brooks and Andrea White in the Business Office, submitted a proposal to NEH that, if awarded, will extend grant funding from the National Digital Newspapers Program through August 2018 and allow UMD Libraries to digitize and contribute 100,000 additional pages of historic Maryland newspapers to Chronicling America. A decision is expected in late July.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

As part of the Digital Scholarship and Publishing program, the MOSF Journal of Science Fiction (http://publish.lib.umd.edu/scifi) has recently been launched and the first issue was released in late January.  Developed in collaboration with the Museum of Science Fiction in Washington, DC, the journal is published three times per year and explores the myriad facets of science fiction.  Check out the first issue at http://publish.lib.umd.edu/scifi/issue/current/showToc.

Caitlin Carter joined Digital Programs and Initiatives as the new graduate assistant for DRUM, which we share with Collection Development.  Caitlin will assist in the day-to-day operations of DRUM and also MD-SOAR, the two-year pilot project for a shared digital repository for eleven Maryland institutions.  Caitlin is located in B0293 and can be reached at ccarter1@umd.edu or 5-9432.  Stop by and welcome Caitlin to the Libraries!

Save the date!  Our next speaker for the Future of the Research Library Speaker Series will be Mike Furlough, Executive Director of HathiTrust.  His presentation is scheduled for 19 April at 10:00 am in the Special Events Room of McKeldin.  More details to follow!

Software Development

The new theme for a Responsive Website Design has been launched for the Libraries’ Website (and also Integrated Research Resources on Campus, and Open Educational Resources).  This allows a single website to be delivered to all browsers (desktop, tablet, mobile) with these advantages:

1) mobile devices have access to all website content, unlike the previous separate mobile site

2) improved discovery due to improved search engine rankings from mobile devices

3) reduced developer time to maintain two separate websites

We would like to thank all members of the Web Advisory Committee and all Hippo content editors for their support during the Responsive Website implementation.  They were not able to put their hands on many of the planned changes until relatively late in the process, but waited patiently (even with some slight anxiety), and were willing to react quickly to make necessary changes for the production release.  Thank you very much, the successful launch could not have happened without you.

We have also introduced improvements to Database Finder in conjunction with turning off ResearchPort for College Park.  Discovery of databases is enriched using the Subject Category and SubCategory information attached to each database.  The home page contains a list of all available Subject Categories with their counts.  Subject Categories and SubCategories have also been added to the search filters available on the search results pages.

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

Support to USMAI

The CLAS team responded to 112 Aleph Rx submissions and 28 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in January.

In January configuration of the Aleph sublibrary for Towson’s “TU in Northeastern Maryland” site was completed, allowing the site in Harford County to house and loan collections for their patrons. The team also assisted College Park in its transition from SFX to the WorldCat link resolver.

As part of its work plan for this calendar year, we will be planning an Aleph upgrade to version 22. More information will be shared as plans develop.

Ex Libris News

Ex Libris has launched a new platform called the Knowledge Center, which houses all of their product documentation, as well as training materials, knowledge articles, and developer network. This information is now open and available for anyone to access. A link to the Knowledge Center is available on the USMAI Staff Site

The team also attended an Ex Libris & ProQuest webinar, which addressed the merged company’s product strategy moving forward. Key to the consortium is confirmation that Aleph and other Ex Libris products will be supported and developed for the foreseeable future.

MD-SOAR

MDsoarLOGO

With over 1300 user sessions and 7000 downloads during the month of January, the Maryland Shared Open Access Repository, has been a successful collaboration between DSS, USMAI libraries, and other library partners in Maryland. The repository currently provides access to nearly 2000 items and is growing as libraries promote MD-SOAR to their campus communities.

Staffing

In December DCMR Digitization Assistant Audrey Lengel graduated with an MLS and began work as the Historic Collections & Communications Intern at NPR in January. DCMR Quality Assurance Assistant Quinn Smith also graduated with an MLS in December. Both Audrey and Quinn joined DCMR in 2013.

In January, iSchool graduate student (and SCUA GA) Amy Wickner began a Field Study position with the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project and will be contributing content related to Maryland newspapers, as well as links to our newspapers in Chronicling America as appropriate, to Wikipedia. The project also hired an additional Student Assistant, iSchool graduate student Sara Horn, to assist with metadata collation and quality control.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola, Robin Pike, Doug McElrath (SCUA), Ben Wallberg, and Trevor Munoz met with staff from the Maryland State Archives, Digital Maryland (http://www.digitalmaryland.org/), and WHILBR (http://whilbr.org/) at the end of January to discuss the expansion of newspaper digitization efforts in the state beyond the NDNP. Work will continue with these, and possibly additional, partners throughout 2016.

Heidi Hanson attended the 2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston.

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Job Enrichment with SSDR

Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to participate in the Libraries’ Job Enrichment Program with the Software Systems Development and Research (SSDR) department in McKeldin.

After building a web site for a class I took at the journalism school, I had become more interested in the nuts and bolts of responsive design, and the Job Enrichment Program was a great opportunity to learn more.

Here are some of the key things I got to learn about:

  • The complexity of our web presence – Seeing what goes into our web site gave me an appreciation for the expertise needed to keep our web presence up-to-date, especially as our mobile presence becomes more important to both users and to Google’s search rankings. I learned about Hippo’s role as the Libraries’ CMS and how it manages the code that delivers a device-driven layout. I also learned how a feature-rich Bootstrap template helps determine a site’s look and feel.
  • Web development workflow – Having served on the Web Advisory Committee (WAC) for the last year and a half, it was very informative seeing how recommendations from our committee are prioritized and implemented by SSDR staff. During the program, I got experience 1) documenting key site features that needed to be translated to the new responsive site 2) creating site mockups for the Libraries’ main page and 3) working within SSDR’s workflow management software and process.
  • Responsive Design layout decisions – Part of my job enrichment experience also included going through Lynda.com lessons focused on designing sites within the Bootstrap framework. These lessons and exercises helped me get a hands-on understanding of Bootstrap’s grid-based system which helps determine a web site’s layout.
  • Creating a code library – I also got to help expand a code library that will support the rollout of the Libraries’ new site in 2016, particularly with the implementation of multimedia elements. The code library will allow website editors to quickly grab Hippo-friendly HTML code and  add multimedia elements – image sliders, image tiles, breadcrumbs, and more – to their web sites.
  • Future possibilities – While managing social media channels doesn’t often require the creation of new web sites, I am starting to see how a multimedia-rich responsive site could add a lot of value to our online outreach efforts. Understanding the basic building blocks of the new responsive site has helped me see the potential for projects that integrate our site with social media outreach efforts.

Overall, the Job Enrichment program was a great introduction to SSDR’s work delivering our digital resources to library users, and I’d definitely recommend the program to others.

Aaron K. Ginoza

Social Media & Community Engagement Coordinator

UMD Libraries

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Stew of the month: November 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

On November 13, Robin Pike and Liz Caringola visited Frostburg State University to discuss the digitization of the Frostburg Mining Journal and other Frostburg newspapers held in print by their Special Collections. Digitization of these important Western Maryland newspapers will move forward contingent on the award of a third NDNP grant, which would begin on September 1, 2016.

Other Digitization Activities

The vendor digitization projects went out including: over 10,000 pages to the Internet Archive from SCUA collection materials and diaries from the William Kapell collection in IPAM. These projects were funded by the DIC project proposal process.

Eric Cartier worked with Cindy Frank, Director of the Visual Resources Collection in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, to arrange a Digital Data Services digitization request with an architecture professor. Digitization assistants are scanning more than 100 color slides featuring images of buildings across the French countryside.

GA David Durden completed a reference spreadsheet of the most prominent grants that support digitization and digital projects. Robin will use this resource as she meets with librarians and staff to discuss funding sources for future digitization projects.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Over the course of the fall, DPI carried out a pilot to test the technical feasibility of hosting the International Children’s Digital Library on DSS servers. ICDL is a free and open repository of Children’s Literature in various languages that was developed by faculty in the iSchool. The pilot was a success, so with Collections Strategies and Services having expressed their interest in supporting this important collection, the Libraries are now moving ahead to provide web hosting services for the ICDL. For more information on the ICDL, see http://childrenslibrary.org.

Transcribe Maryland is a pilot project to test the workflows and procedures for crowdsourced transcription of Digital Collections materials. In November, Josh Westgard carried out the migration of more than 17,000 images making up over 800 documents from our digital collections repository to a platform to support public transcriptions of those documents. The pilot project will take place in the spring semester 2016 in support of a course being offered in the English Department.

DPI, with help from DSS colleagues, is about to launch REDCap an open source web application created by Vanderbilt University for building and managing online surveys and databases. REDCap will be offered as a part of Research Data Services and available to UMD faculty and researchers. Please contact lib-research-data@umd.edu for more information.

Software Development

Hippo CMS  has been successfully upgraded to version 7.9.  The primary improvements for content creators are the new CKEditor for making HTML content changes and the channel manager options to preview pages on various device screen sizes.  Also, automatic updates for database finder and the staff directory have been restored.

The project to move the website to a Responsive Web Design template is now entering its final phases.  The majority of the template development work has been completed and being prepared for promotion to production.  We are also working with the Web Advisory Committee to test the new template and create training opportunities for staff on how to update their content in preparation for the January 18 release date.

Initial development of the Fedora 4 authorization module based on the emerging Web Access Control (WebAC) standard for RDF based Access Control has been completed.  This new feature is being incorporated into the design for our Fedora 4 repository instance and the new Digital Collections administrative interface based on Hydra.

Staffing

Barbara Percival joined DCMR in November. A first-year iSchool student, she is currently producing digital files, and she’ll take over quality assurance inspections in 2016.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola was appointed to the MARAC Web Editing Team, effective January 1, 2016, for a two-year term.

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Stew of the month: October 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Liz Caringola, Robin Pike, and Doug McElrath (SCUA) are writing a grant application to extend NDNP funding for the project through August 2018. The application is due to NEH by mid-January 2016 and a decision should be reached by the end of July.

Other Digitization Activities

Robin Pike worked on the estimates for the FY16 vendor digitization contracts, to digitize the projects funded by the Digitization Initiatives Committee (DIC) project proposal process to include:

  • Approximately 53,000 pages and 460 volumes through the Internet Archive
  • Over 350 volumes of other book digitization
  • Approximately 350 oversize flat maps and posters
  • Approximately 21,000 pages from The Diamondback newspaper (from microfilm and print)
  • Approximately 9,000 photos from The Diamondback photo morgue
  • Diaries and correspondence from three archival collections
  • Over 2,000 audio reels from the School of Music archives and the WAMU radio archives
  • Over 70 U-Matic tapes of interviews with music experts from the Bryer collection
  • 42 deteriorating films

Robin Pike also presented at the Library Assembly meeting on behalf of the DIC to open the project proposal process for FY17 projects.

Digital  Programs and Initiatives

Theses and dissertations from the 2015 summer semester, totaling 261, have been deposited in DRUM bringing the total number of ETDs (electronic theses and dissertations) in the repository to 10,750.  Percentage of embargo requests climbed to 54% for the summer semester; an all-time high since we started tracking requests in 2006.

Terry Owen was invited to speak as part of Catholic University Library’s program on institutional repositories for International Open Access Week, 19-25 October.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola attended the Fall 2015 MARAC meeting in Roanoke, VA, October 8-10. Liz was co-chair of the conference program committee, which also included several colleagues from SCUA. Many others from SCUA, SCPA, and MITH participated in the conference as workshop instructors, session moderators, and speakers. Former DCMA/DPI GA Alice Prael presented at a student session with current SCUA GA Amy Wickner.

Visits

On October 22, Robin Pike and Eric Cartier guest-lectured and provided a tour of the Hornbake Digitization Center for LBSC 784Q, Digital Preservation, regarding digitization and digital preservation activities at the UMD Libraries.

Liz Caringola was a guest speaker in LBSC731: Special Collections on October 26 and spoke about digitization and project management in Special Collections.

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Stew of the month: September 2015

Welcome to a new issue of Stew of the Month, a monthly blog from Digital Systems and Stewardship (DSS) at the University of Maryland Libraries. This blog provides news and updates from the DSS Division. We welcome comments, feedback and ideas for improving our products and services.

Digitization Activities

Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

The first batch of newspapers for the 2014-2016 grant was accepted by Library of Congress and are now available on Chronicling America. The Catoctin Clarion from Mechanicstown (modern-day Thurmont), Maryland, is available from 1871-1919. Additional issues through 1922 will be uploaded in a later batch.

Other Digitization Activities

The sole source for the FY16 digitization vendor was approved. Robin Pike will contact collection managers to begin digitization after additional steps are completed (negotiating technical specifications, receiving quotes for estimates, sending signed quotes back, scheduling projects).

Robin worked with Vin Novara (SCPA) to submit a Letter of Inquiry to the Grammy Grant Foundation to apply for an Archiving and Preservation Projects grant to digitize the audio recordings in the Contemporary Music Project Archives.

Eric Cartier worked with Josh Westgard and Bria Parker (MSD) to make 98 digitized videos from the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange Archives (SCPA) and 39 digitized audio recordings from the Thirteen/WNET Arthur Godfrey Collection (SCUA) available in UMD Digital Collections. Both projects were digitized as part of the FY15 Digitization Initiatives Committee project proposal process.

Eric and assistant Cecilia Franck performed quality assurance on 137 digitized football films from the University Archives collections, which will be ingested into Digital Collections. Cecilia also performed sampled quality assurance on 590 digitized historic dissertations that will be ingested into DRUM.

Software Development

During internal testing of the new Hippo CMS  version 7.9 upgrade process we discovered some holes in our upgrade procedure and have been working on filling out the missing code and re-testing.  Unfortunately, progress on this issue was interrupted by instability problems in the production Hippo system which we tracked down to a conflict between several of our batch content loaders (Database Finder, Staff Directory) and a Hippo system architecture change we put into place in August.  As an interim step the instability problem has been fixed by disabling the batch loaders.  We are working with Hippo support staff to determine the root cause of the problem.

We are now in full implementation mode for the new Responsive Web Design template for the website.  This has involved some rapid design and decision making, as well as training for four developers new to Hippo CMS.  Once we complete our first draft of the core templates we will begin a process to promote the templates to the staging site for Libraries staff to get their first look their existing content rendered in the new site.  This will help them to make an assessment on how much work will be involved when it comes time to begin updating their content for the new site.

User and System Support

This summer, the Libraries embarked on a project to renovate the technology in classrooms 6103 and 6107 in Mckeldin Library. User Systems and Support (USS) and Teaching and Learning Services (TLS) worked together on the project to find a new way to use current technology along with different teaching methods in the classrooms so the rooms would be more dynamic and flexible. USS and TLS chose to try to have everything mobile. Since the furniture, Mac desktops, projector screens, and projector wouldn’t be able to support this new mobile initiative, they were all removed. Power outlets in the room were rearranged to go from supporting a static room to a more dynamic room.

USS evaluated and designed the technology, suggested furniture, and determined power outlet locations. To replace the projector, four 60 inch Sony Aqous TVs were purchased. sitting on mobile Peerless AV stands. The TVs weren’t installed on walls, but were installed on Peerless AV stands so the TVs can be rolled anywhere in the room (or outside the room). The main instructor laptop has an ActionTech wireless HD Video Transmitter installed on it. The transmitted video will go to an ActionTech wireless HD Video Receiver on each cart. This will allow an instructor the ability to show the same content to all the TV carts at the same time. The idea is to allow the students to be able to crowd around any TV so everyone can clearly see what the instructor is presenting, instead of the people close to the back of the room straining their eyes.   However, another purpose is to allow the students to split off in groups, each screen displaying different content so students can collaborate the assignments they are given. Each TV also has multiple inputs so students can connect and display what’s on the screen of their laptops, iPads, tablets, and other devices.

A special thanks goes to those in USS involved in getting the new room configurations and technology changed and installed — Alex Guzman, Brandon Eldred, Chamisa Carson, Francis Ifeacho, Grace Derbyshire, Pancratius Chuba, Preston Tobery, Sandra Ayensu, Stephanie Karunwi, Victoria Quartey. Also, thanks goes out to Rachel Gammons and the rest of Teaching and Learning Services for working with us to successfully renovate and add new technology in classrooms 6103 and 6107.

 

USMAI (University System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions) Library Consortium

The CLAS team responded to 92 Aleph Rx submissions and 23 e-resource requests from across the consortium’s libraries in September.

clas-notes

CLAS Notes

In an effort to keep consortium members informed about important information and procedures, the CLAS team has started a weekly publication called CLAS Notes. Weekly notes are targeted at specific audiences (as determined by mailing list membership), but you can always view all the notes on the USMAI Staff Site at http://usmai.umd.edu/category/news-categories/clas-notes.

Staffing

David Steelman moved from a System Analyst position to a Software Developer position. David received his Bachelor of Science, Comprehensive, from Villanova University and his Master of Science, Computer Science, from the University of Maryland, College Park.  Before coming to work at College Park, he worked at Raytheon Solipsys Corporation where he worked as a Senior Software Engineer, working on projects such as the Tactical Display Framework (TDF), a Java-based object-oriented Command and Control Battle Management package.

Conferences, workshops and professional development

Liz Caringola and Robin Pike attended the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) annual meeting in Washington, D.C. September 16-18. Liz gave a lightning talk on the Gateway to Digitized Maryland Newspapers, a database using Hippo/Solr that will allow users to easily identify sources for digitized Maryland newspapers. The gateway should be online after the next Hippo upgrade. Look for an announcement and additional information at that time.

Robin also attended the one-day Digital Maryland AV Conference held at the University of Baltimore on September 25.

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